Lt. Richard V. Keywan, 352nd Fighter Squadron Follow Up Post

I’ve been absent from the blogosphere for quite some time – planning the forthcoming reunion and other 353rd history related endeavours are my only excuse. Hopefully I will resume posting more regularly in the near future. In the meantime, Laurent Herisson has kindly got in touch with some photos of the memorial dedication on May 8, 2015 in his home village of Gaudreville. I’m sure you will join me in thanking Laurent for all his endeavours to ensure Lt. Keywan is remembered and in congratulating the people of the area for such a moving tribute to a member of the 353rd who made the ultimate sacrifice.

The new memorial stone to Lt. Keywan in Gaudreville (Herisson)

The new memorial stone to Lt. Keywan in Gaudreville (Herisson)

Dedication of the memorial by the ocal community (Herisson)

Dedication of the memorial by the local community (Herisson)

Gaudreville Flags (Herisson)

Gaudreville Flags (Herisson)

Parts of Lt. Keywan's Thunderbolt (Herisson)

Parts of Lt. Keywan’s Thunderbolt (Herisson)

GPA Amphibious Jeep on the day (Herisson)

GPA Amphibious Jeep on the day (Herisson)

Click on links for news articles reporting the day (in French)

inauguration de la stèle 8 mai 2015

2013-07-17 182138

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under 352nd Fighter Squadron

Lt. Richard V. Keywan, 352nd Fighter Squadron

I was recently contacted by Laurent Henrisson from Gaudreville, France. His village  are dedicating a memorial plaque for Lt. Richard V. Keywan of the 352nd Fighter Squadron on May 8, 2015. Laurent has been investigating the circumstances of the crash that cost Lt. Keywan his life and sent me below write-up of events June 12, 1944.

I thought it rather touching and significant that the village in which Lt. Keywan lost his life are looking to remember him this year. I have never had any contact with Lt. Keywan’s family and the village are hopeful that they will be able to trace someone to attend the ceremony on their behalf and, as a public event, welcome anyone who would like to attend. Sadly, I cannot make the trip due to a prior commitment.

If anyone out there has contact with the Keywan family then drop me a line or Laurent direct…

Lt. Keywan's story by Laurent Henrisson (L Henrisson)

Lt. Keywan’s story by Laurent Henrisson (L Henrisson)

A rough translation from the French of the above by me (with apologies):

“4:34 pm, June 12, 1944, off the resort 157 Raydon (Suffolk UK). Colonel Duncan directs three squadrons of 12 aircraft with an escort of eight P-47, 351 FS and 352 FS on a mission bombing and strafing against enemy communications in the region of Evreux – Dreux. In Evreux, squads split up to attack specific targets:
The 352FS, led by Lieutenant Colonel Bailey takes care of a truck convoy near Evreux before heading to rail objectives and Goms station. He soon found himself outclassed by 50 Messerschmitt 109 German. In this action 1st Lt. Richard V. Keywan destroyed and damaged two Me 109 before he was brought down by enemy fire.
Coming from the direction “the boscherons – Gaudreville” Richard bailed out, but too low. Indeed his parachute did not have time to open and he was killed and on the edge of the Vigne Street. His plane ended up in a field 500 yards away without causing damage in the village.
A posthumous award was made to Lt. Keywan Lieutenant of the Distinguished Flying Cross with oak leaf (DFC – OLC)
An eyewitness reported that his body had been buried in our village cemetery. At the end of the war, like many Americans fighters, he was laid to rest in the Américan cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer.
For your sacrifice Richard: RIP (Rest In PEACE).

L. HERISSON

A big thank you to everyone who helped me in these particular research Mr Rémy Square, Ms. Seuret, Mr Christian Lefébvre and the municipality of Gaudreville. I remain available and contactable for any additional information about this aircraft.”

 

Leave a comment

Filed under 352nd Fighter Squadron

Lt. Stanley S. Petticrew Jr., 351st Fighter Squadron, January 20, 1922 – January 21, 2015.

I have to report that we have lost another veteran of the 351st Fighter Squadron. Pilot Stanley Scott Petticrew Jr., passed away January 21, 2015 in his home town of Springfield, Ohio – the day after his 93rd birthday.

Stan undertook ten hours familiarisation flying in a Piper Cub at Birmingham Southern College during April/May 1943 and then completed his pre-flight at Maxwell Field, Alabama, his primary training at Decatur, Alabama, his basic at Courland, Alabama and his advanced training in Craig Field, Alabama – graduating February 2, 1944. No doubt the amount of time he spent in Alabama during his training resulted in the name of his P-51 with the 351st “Birmingham Anne.”

Stan then completed 100 hours in P-40s at Fort Myers and Page Field where he served with the 15th FS of the 53rd FG. After this he travelled to Camp Kilmer and on August 4, 1944 embarked on a 15 day voyage to the United Kingdom arriving at Bristol.

After a short stay with the 495th Fighter Training Group at Goxhill (August 20 – September 18, 1944) he joined the 505th FS, 339th FG at Fowlmere and recalled that he flew several mission with them (I have no further details to confirm this at this point).  The 353rd FG were at this time desperately short of pilots and so ten pilots were hastily transferred from  Fowlmere to Raydon  on October 2, 1944 (they were Warren, Linger, Clark, Rosen, Arnold, Fulton, French, Gilmer, Petticrew and Brock). Stan knew many of these pilots well from training and was saddened when Arnold, French and Brock were later killed in action.

The Group did not give him long to settle in. Stan flew the first of 65 missions from Raydon on October 12, 1944 and his last on April 20, 1945. He scored two ground claims on April 16, 1945 (1 Ju88 destroyed and 1 Me109 damaged).  His assigned aircraft was YJ-Y “Birmingham Anne” (a/c 44-11191). This aircraft has a number of names associated with it and was certainly flown by Stan for a time under its previous owner’s name “Betts 2nd” (as named by Lt. Christensen).

Stan was very proud of his association with the Squadron and Group and returned to Raydon in 1995 as part of the reunion party that year. I also had the pleasure of meeting him at several reunions in the United States and spending a very pleasant day with him at the Wright Patterson USAF museum in 1998. He was buried January 24, 2015 with a full USAF Honour Guard in attendance.

This news is posted with condolences to his family at this time and with thanks to his niece, Melinda Callahan, for notifying us of this sad news.

2 Comments

Filed under 351st Fighter Squadron

Robert F. Hahn – Fighter Pilot of the 351st Fighter Squadron.

It is with great sadness that I have to start the year with a  report that we have lost another Group veteran recently. Robert F. Hahn II writes that his father, Robert F. Hahn, passed away December 9, 2014 aged 93.

Bob Hahn joined the 351st Squadron in the autumn of 1944 and flew his first mission on November 10 of that year. Over the coming months he flew some 54 missions with his final operational flight made on April 19, 1945.

He claimed one Me109 destroyed in the air and four Ju88s destroyed and one Ju88 damaged on the ground. On April 7, 1945, flying wing to Capt. McGraw, he reported:

At about 12.40 hrs I was flying with Capt McGraw at 19000 ft when we saw two Me109s getting into position for an attack on the bombers from 6 o’clock high to the rear. They were coming from the right side of the bombers. We made a climbing turn to the right to cut them off. Capt McGraw told me to take the one on the left. I pulled up behind mine and opened fire. I observed strikes and the e/a started smoking. I then pulled off to stay with my leader and cover his tail. I saw mine slowly roll over and head straight down. At the same time, Capt McGraw’s target started into a spin and a wing broke off. No chutes appeared from either plane. His next claims, again as wing man to Capt. McGraw, came on the big strafing mission of April 16, 1945: I followed my leader, Capt McGraw, down on Kircham landing ground making my pass in a south westerly direction. On my first pass I put a few bursts into a Ju88 backed into the woods on the far side of the field. I pulled off and followed my leader around for a second pass. On this pass I poured lead into the Ju88 and observed it to burst into flames. As I pulled up over the flaming aircraft, I observed another of the same type just to the left of it. On my second pass this Ju88 also burst into flames. On these passes I observed numerous fires scattered all along the edge of the woods. The traffic pattern was then reversed. After making approximately eight passes on three t/e e/a, believed to be Ju88s, on the opposite side of the woods, these a/c failed to burn although I covered each with numerous strikes. When the Squadron left the field these three a/c had not been destroyed.

He later recounted the grim realities of this type of mission:

It was a balmy April day. Our Group recorded its biggest bag and I flew my first strafing mission. By tea time there were so many wrecked Nazis that it took a while to count up the victories. We knew a flak barrage protected Pocking airdrome and that expert camouflage concealed several hundred planes of all shapes and sizes. Our Squadron Commander said we should get at least two apiece. The flak was terrific, but we took care of it. The guns were not place to fire head on or down, so we flew under the flak and put some emplacements out of business by firing into them head on. I saw bodies of gunners tossed into the air by the impact of our bullets. There were Mustangs all over the place, making patterns from every possible angle. It reminded me of ground gunnery practice in the States. Because of the congestion, my flight moved out to an auxiliary field nearby. The planes, hidden with tree branches, were parked in the surrounding woods. I could barely see their noses protruding on the grassy landing strip. In a nearby field a farmer had abandoned his ploughing and was lying in a furrow, his arms wrapped around his head. Another Farmer was kind of fatalistic – he went right on working, hardly glancing up as we made our passes at the planes. Small arms fire opened up from adjacent barracks and a couple of Mustangs left the woods to work over the buildings until the enemy fire stopped. I followed my flight commander down, our propellers inches above the grass. We finally saw some pine covered Junkers which hadn’t been picked yet as targets. I pressed the trigger and as the first Junkers exploded I turned to another. I made pass after pass at them from every angle and one of them blew up, throwing debris sky high. Only one of my guns was working so I called it a day and headed home.

A Second Lieutenant while with the 351st Fighter Squadron, Bob Hahn remained in the USAF post WWII and retired as a Major in 1964. Bob was one of the first group veterans I got to know and it was always a pleasure to meet with this lively, animated man at reunions in Raydon and the United States. He will be sorely missed and this is posted with condolences to all his family and with thanks to his son Robert for communicating the sad news.

2 Comments

Filed under 351st Fighter Squadron

Season’s Greetings

It’s looking like 2015 is set to be an exciting year for the 353rd Fighter Group and their friends and I look forward to seeing many of you in Raydon this coming August. In the meantime, thank you for all your comments and support with the blog over the last year and I send my best wishes to you for the holidays and New Year…

Christmas at the Auger Inn, Raydon 1944 (353rd FG Archive)

Christmas at the Auger Inn, Raydon 1944 (353rd FG Archive)

1 Comment

Filed under 353rd Fighter Group

A Brief History of SX-C and SX-F of the 352nd Fighter Squadron

SX-C

The following is posted with grateful thanks to Lt Col. McCollom’s daughter, Patty McCollom Bauchman.

A/C 42-8531 P-47D-5-RE. This olive drab Thunderbolt appears to have come into the Squadron in early September 1943. Lt Col. Loren “Mac” McCollom took it as his personal aircraft and named it “Butch II” for his wife. As commander of the 61st FS, 56th Fighter Group, McCollom called his P-47 “Butch.” His daughter Patty explains that “Butch” was her father’s humorous nickname for her mother – a very diminutive, feminine and educated woman who you could never imagine calling “Butch.” When he left the 56th to join the 353rd, McCollom’s old P-47 would likely have remained on the 56th books and the natural thing to do would be to call the new 353rd aircraft “Butch II.” It seems that “Butch II” was disappointingly unreliable in the air. McCollom’s diary for the time recorded that “she’s a little rough I’m afraid” on September 7, 1943 and then “Butch II is still a little rough and not as fast as Butch” on the following day. McCollom’s frustration was evident in his diary entry for October 20 writing “[I] had to come back because she overheated. I’m going to have to give Butch II up. She’s just not dependable.” To add to these problems, Glenn Duncan had lost a wingtip from the aircraft in combat on September 23, 1943 so you can imagine that McCollom was probably not sorry to lose the aircraft.

After McCollom, the aircraft then became the assigned aircraft of Lt. Gordon L. Willits, but there are few records indicating that he ever flew it operationally. It did receive further battle damage while being flown by Major Bill Bailey on December 1, 1943. By the time records do become more comprehensive in January, 1944 it seems a variety of 352nd Squadron pilots flew it, but with no regular pilot it perhaps had a poor reputation in the Squadron. It last flew operationally with the Squadron on March 6, 1944 in the hands of Lt. Clifford F. Armstrong and probably left the Group soon after this date. There are no details about the ground crew for SX-C.

The aircraft shows up twice in subsequent accident reports after leaving the Group. The first is an accident at the hands of Reavy H. Giles while landing at RAF Woodchurch on April 23, 1944. The second was taxiing accident by Ansel J. Wheeler of the 373rd Fighter Group at Le Culot (A-89) on December 10, 1944.

Just as a final note on SX-C – the coding was only used once in the Squadron during the entire war. Inevitably this fact has brought some speculation that it was not used again as a tribute to Lt. Col. McCollom who was brought down by flak on the mission of November 25, 1943 to become a POW. This now seems unlikely to me as McCollom, it would appear, had given up the aircraft at some point in late October. Roger Freeman in his 56th Fighter Group (Oxford, 2000), p.21 also describes British Air Ministry recommendations not to use “C” in aircraft codes. This seems a much more plausible reason for the lack of “C” in the Group though I have no further information on this at this stage.

SX-F

A recent query from the 8th Fighter Command research community has prodded me out of inaction on the aircraft histories part of this blog. So here is a summary of the tragic history of SX-F aircraft with the 352nd resulting from that query.

A/C 42-7904 P-47D-1-RE. This olive drab Thunderbolt was an early aircraft with the Squadron. It was the assigned aircraft of Lt. Clifford F. Armstrong who named it “8 Gun Melody” Cross’s Jonah’s Feet Are Dry has an early picture of this aircraft (p.57) and a close-up of the artwork on (p.88). The aircraft continued in Armstrong’s hands, but was lost along with 1st Lt. Victor L. Vogel on January 11, 1944.

A well-known photo of Lt. Cliff Armstrong about to climb into his aircraft  SX-F "8 Gun Melody" (a/c P-47D-1-RE 42-7904). Lt. Vogel was lost flying this aircraft January 11, 1944.

A well-known photo of Lt. Cliff Armstrong about to climb into his aircraft SX-F “8 Gun Melody” (a/c P-47D-1-RE 42-7904). Lt. Vogel was lost flying this aircraft January 11, 1944.

A/C 42-75622 P-47D-15-RE. This olive drab Thunderbolt was a replacement for Lt. Clifford F. Armstrong’s first aircraft. He named his second aircraft “Hun Buster” and flew it regularly until he completed his tour extension at the end of June 1944. There are two photographs of this aircraft in Cross’s Jonah’s Feet Are Dry (p. 208). The aircraft was then flown by a variety of Squadron pilots until assigned to F/O John J. Swanezy. He named the aircraft “Betty” and flew it throughout July and into August, 1944. Swanezy was killed in action while flying this aircraft on August 18, 1944. There is a nice colour photo of this aircraft available from the Jeff Ethel collection HERE though I have seen other versions of this photo but cannot establish who actually has the copyright. Although it does not appear that the Squadron flew another SX-F before converting to Mustangs, the records for September are missing so it can only be assumed that no further SX-F coded Thunderbolts existed.

A/C 44-14694 P-51D-10-NA. This Mustang was long-serving as one of the original aircraft assigned to the Squadron. The original pilot, Lt. Herbert F. Niklaus, flew it on 19 missions before completing his tour at the end of January, 1945. The aircraft was then taken over Lt. Albert P. Lang who named the aircraft “Eleanor” and flew it on 25 missions between January, 1945 and the end of the war. Tragically, 1st Lt. Edward A. Knickelbein lost his life in this aircraft after a mid-air collision and crash on July 3, 1945 near Stowmarket, Suffolk. There is a full account and pictures of the accident in Cross’s Jonah’s Feet Are Dry (p.624-625).

P-51D-10-NA (44-14694) SX-F. This aircraft was assigned to Lt. Niklaus and then to Lt. Albert P. Lang who was most likely responsible for the name "Eleanor" (M Martorella/353rd FG Archive).

P-51D-10-NA (44-14694) SX-F. This aircraft was assigned to Lt. Niklaus and then to Lt. Albert P. Lang who was most likely responsible for the name “Eleanor” (M Martorella/353rd FG Archive).

There are no SX-F bars recorded as flying with the Squadron.

As a final note on the crew for SX-F that flew as part of “B” Flight. The crew chief on the Thunderbolts was S/Sgt Joseph F. Brandon, Assistant Crew Chief was S/Sgt Raymond A. Wierzgacz and the armourer was Cpl. Earl A. Dunn. The crew for the Mustang period is unconfirmed and may have either changed entirely or in part. There is some evidence to suggest that Pvt. Joe Lopez may have been armourer at this time.

 

2 Comments

Filed under 352nd Fighter Squadron

1st Lt. John W. Bishop, 351st Fighter Squadron

Scott Bishop has been in touch with some further  information and pictures from his stepfather’s wartime album. 1st Lt. John W. Bishop from Austin, Texas flew a tour with the 351st Fighter Squadron from June to October 1944. He completed 270 combat hours and was awarded the Air Medal with four oak leaf clusters and the DFC. Lt Bishop was the pilot of P-47 Thunderbolt YJ-E “Patrica Baby” lost along with Lt. Greene on September 17, 1944.  Some of the photos from Lt. Bishop’s album are posted here with thanks to Scott Bishop for sharing this fascinating further information. Rather than cropping the photos, I have left the original captions as they were written by John Bishop. Some of the details are also quite difficult to see so just click on the images for a larger view.

1st Lt. John W. Bishop (0-663448) of Austin Texas and the 351st Fighter Squadron in June 1944 (S Bishop).

1st Lt. John W. Bishop (0-663448) of Austin Texas and the 351st Fighter Squadron in July 1944 (S Bishop).

Lt. Bishop during basic training (S Bishop)

Lt. Bishop during basic training (S Bishop)

Lt. Bishop with "his old P-47." Note that this is clearly not YJ-E "Patrica Baby" and may well be another aircraft as he was not consistently flying YJ-E until the end of July, 1944 (S Bishop)

Lt. Bishop with “his old P-47.” Note that this is clearly not YJ-E “Patrica Baby” and may well be another aircraft as he was not consistently flying YJ-E until the end of July, 1944 (S Bishop)

Lt. Bishop outside his barrack hut at Raydon. The "Weg" may roughly translate as road or way in Dutch and German - thus "Immelmann Road/Way" as the huts title after the famous combat manoeuvre - though this is entirely speculation on my part. Maybe someone can be more precise as to its meaning? (S Bishop)

Lt. Bishop outside his barrack hut at Raydon. The “Weg” may roughly translate as road or way in Dutch and German – thus “Immelmann Road/Way” after the famous combat manoeuvre – though this is entirely speculation on my part. Maybe someone can be more precise as to its meaning? (S Bishop)

Lt. Bishop's mission and award record - click for larger view (353rd FG Archive)

Lt. Bishop’s mission and award record – click for larger view (353rd FG Archive)

A page from a map belonging to Lt. Bishop showing the location of Raydon (S Bishop)

A page from a map belonging to Lt. Bishop showing the location of Raydon (S Bishop)

 Around the Base at Raydon

The "Thunderbolt Theatre" at Raydon (S Bishop)

The “Thunderbolt Theatre” at Raydon (S Bishop)

Left to right are Bishop, Stump, Milligan [looks like Maguire], Compton and Fuchs [Intelligence Officer] (S Bishop)

Left to right are Bishop, Stump, Milligan [looks like Maguire], Compton and Fuchs [Intelligence Officer] (S Bishop)

Left to right are Rosen, Murray, Stump (with Capt. bars), Murphy, Knicklebein, unknown and Milligan (S Bishop)

Left to right are Rosen, Murray, Stump (with Capt. bars), Murphy, Knicklebein, unknown and Milligan (S Bishop)

Inside the barrack hut at Raydon (S Bishop)

Inside the barrack hut at Raydon (S Bishop)

"Big Friends" returning home over Raydon (S Bishop)

“Big Friends” returning home over Raydon (S Bishop)

Colchester High Street - not much has changed since the 1940s (S Bishop)

Colchester High Street – not much has changed since the 1940s (S Bishop)

Transition to Mustangs

Lt. George S. Montgomery from Opelika, Alabama flew with the 351st between August, 1944 and April 1945. The aircraft is unidentified, but may well be his (S Bishop)

Lt. George S. Montgomery from Opelika, Alabama flew with the 351st between August, 1944 and April 1945. The aircraft is unidentified, but may well be his (S Bishop)

Thunderbolt and Mustangs at Raydon (S Bishop)

Thunderbolt and Mustangs at Raydon (S Bishop)

Being checked out on the P-51. Lt. Bishop's first Mustang mission was on October 3, 1944. From the flight of four Mustangs taking part Capt. Daniel became a POW when his aircraft engine failed. His element lead aborted as escort to the struggling aircraft - hence Bishop's note about two lost. (S Bishop)

Being checked out on the P-51. Lt. Bishop’s first Mustang mission was on October 3, 1944. From the flight of four Mustangs taking part Capt. Daniel became a POW when his aircraft engine failed. His element lead aborted as escort to the struggling aircraft – hence Bishop’s note about two lost. (S Bishop)

Lt. Walter E. Murphy of Albany, IN and the 351st Fighter Squadron (S Bishop)

Lt. Walter E. Murphy of Albany, IN and the 351st Fighter Squadron (S Bishop)

"Donna J" (serial and code currently unknown) is thought to be the aircraft of Lt. Billy J. Murray who appears to be seated in the cockpit (S Bishop)

“Donna J” (serial and code need checking) is thought to be the aircraft of Lt. Billy J. Murray who appears to be seated in the cockpit (S Bishop)

A Typical Mission

The 351st Ready Room at Raydon (S Bishop)

The 351st Ready Room at Raydon (S Bishop)

Heading to the planes from the briefing hut at Raydon (S Bishop)

Heading to the planes from the briefing hut at Raydon (S Bishop)

Heading to the aircraft (S Bishop)

Heading to the aircraft (S Bishop)

Take-off (S Bishop)

Take-off (S Bishop)

Take-off (S Bishop)

Take-off (S Bishop)

Lining up - in the front in Fred Lefebre's "Willit Run?" (S Bishop)

Lining up – in the front in Fred Lefebre’s “Willit Run?” (S Bishop)

Mustangs of the 351st FS take-off (S Bishop)

Mustangs of the 351st FS take-off (S Bishop)

7 Comments

Filed under 351st Fighter Squadron

Mission#90 March 8, 1944 – Target: Berlin. The Loss of 1st Lt. John Zolner, 350th Fighter Squadron

Date: Mar 8, 44

Dispatched: 47 Aborts: 5

Mission: Penetration support to 3rd ATF, 180 B-24s

Field Order: 263 Target: Berlin

Time Up/Down: 11:22 hrs     14:40 hrs Leader: Lt Col. Rimerman

Claims Air: 05-01-02 Claims Ground: 00-00-00 Lost/Damaged: 01-03

Landfall Ijmuiden 12:13 hrs, 21-27,000ft, with 2nd Div B-24s from  L/F to point approx 20 miles north of Brunswick where P-38s R/V’d and Group left bombers at 13:30 hrs. L/F out Ijmuiden 14:25 hrs altitudes from deck up to 20,000ft. Bomber formation very poor in units larger than Groups. NE of Dummer Lake 6+ Fw190s were attacked by the 352nd FS resulting in 3 destroyed and 2 damaged, engagements ranging from 28,000ft down to the deck. SE of Dummer Lake, Red Flight of the 350th FS engaged and destroyed long nosed Fw190. Vicinity of Hanover 1 Fw190 driven down to deck by White flight 350th FS and damaged. In this engagement Lt. Zolner’s A/C received a hit in main fuel tank by ground flak resulting in the loss of fuel. Lt. Zolner proceeded out on deck until out of fuel and forced to bail out approx. 10 miles west of Almelo, Holland. He was seen to land in a road. One pilot returning on deck strafed gun position on beach complete with personnel vicinity of Ijmuiden. One pilot returning early observed single B-17G with only star marking about 40 miles east of Orfordness flying 165 degrees. Pilot turned and followed B-17 which made L/F vicinity Ostend and continued inland. Flak encountered in several places along the route but not unusual. One B-24 with one engine on fire was escorted from vicinity Dummer Lake to middle of North Sea. Channel “A” good but Channel “C” marred by whistle. Lt. Garey, wingman for Lt Zolner (MIA), arrived home late from advanced airfield. He claims Lt. Zolner destroyed an Fw190 in the Hanover area when E/A was positioning itself for an attack on White Flight at 4,000ft. Coming out on deck, Lt. Garey strafed a locomotive in Germany. Lt Col. Rimerman of Group HQ participated.

Claims:

1 Fw190 destroyed Capt. Robertson, 352nd FS

1 Fw190 destroyed Lt. Dustin, 352nd FS

1 Fw190 destroyed Lt. Knoble, 352nd FS

1 Fw190 (long nose) destroyed Lt. Hart, 350th FS

1 Fw190 destroyed Lt. Zolner, 350th FS

1 Fw190 damaged (shared) Lt Col. Rimerman and Lt. Stearns, 350th FS [later awarded to Rimerman as a probable].

1 Fw190 damaged Capt. Robertson, 352nd FS

1 Fw190 damaged Lt. Knoble, 352nd FS

1 Gun position, complete with personnel, strafed by Lt. Willits, 352nd FS

1 Loco damaged (in Germany) Lt. Garey, 350th FS

350th: Lt Col. Rimerman. T/U 11:16 hrs. T/D 14:40 hrs. Total flight time 03:24 hrs. L/F N Ijmuiden 12:11 hrs, 23,000ft. R/V B-24 before landfall 12:05 hrs, 23,000ft. Good. P-47, P-51. Fw190 – few Dummer Lake, Hanover, 13:28 hrs, 20,000ft. Left coast N Ijmuiden 14:08 hrs, 24,000ft. Meager, heavy accurate linger. Heavy, heavy accurate Hanover. R/T normal. Strato cumulus 4-5,000ft; Germany clear, coast 10/10.

Lt Col Ben Rimerman (Gp Ldr)
1st Lt Richard A. Stearns
1st Lt John Sullivan
1st Lt Chauncey Rowan
1st Lt John Zolner (Flt Ldr) LH-U* 42-8557
2nd Lt Abel H. Garey
1st Lt William F. Tanner
1st Lt Robert S. Hart
Capt Charles W. Dinse (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Arthur C. Bergeron
1st Lt Melvin P. Dawson
1st Lt John H. Winder
1st Lt John L. Devane (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt Tom Lorance
1st Lt William J. Price
1st Lt Charles O. Durant (351st)
2nd Lt Richard L. Bedford (351st Relay)

*[The code is assumed, however, Blick’s combat diary and his letters to me indicate Zolner was flying his aircraft that day. Zolner took his place when Blick was grounded due to a head cold].

The first victory of the day was for 1st Lt. Robert S Hart, flying Red Four in Lt Zolner’s flight, when he saw a lone Fw190 make a pass at his flight:

We had made R/V with the bombers and had worked our way up to the lead unit of B-24’s and crossed over to the left side of them. We were about half way between Dummer Lake and Steinhuder Lake at 24000 ft when a lone Fw190 made a pass at Lt Price, my element leader, and myself. He broke under us and we chased him but Lt Price could not drop his wing tank so we pulled back up.

While climbing back up abreast, the 190 tried to get on Lt Price’s tail. I called him to break and turned into the e/a myself. The 190 went straight for the deck but I easily closed on him and gave a short burst at about 300 yards. I noticed strikes and then closed to about 50 yards when he pulled up. Pieces flew off, the wheels dropped and he was going straight down in smoke when I broke off at about 6000 ft.

As it became time for the Squadron to leave the bombers, an Fw190 cam head-on to White flight. Although 1st Lt. Richard A Stearns was able to fire and observe strikes, Col Rimerman hit it first and was awarded the aircraft as a probable:

A Fw190 came along head on. We turned and passed each other going in opposite directions. He immediately dove and we followed from about 18000 ft to 6 or 8000 where I started to fire from about 4 or 500 yards. The Fw went on to the deck leading us over a couple of airfields and military installations in the Northern suburbs of Hanover. The Fw was taking violent evasive action and really wheeling and dealing in and around these buildings. I got a few strikes in the fuselage and wing roots before I ran out of ammunition.

The lead element of Red flight was in action again over Hanover. This time, separated from their second element, 1st Lt. John Zolner led an attack on an Fw190 trying to bounce Lt Col Rimerman and Lt Stearns as they attacked their aircraft. Zolner’s wing man, 2nd Lt. Abel H. Garey saw Zolner destroy the 190:

Lt. Zolner dove down on the E/A’s tail and gave him a long burst. I had to roll to the side to keep from running into pieces from the e/a. The e/a fell down to the right in a slide slipping position apparently out of control. I tried to see him hit the ground, but couldn’t, because we went on down to help Lt Col. Rimerman and Lt. Stearns who were running an e/a into his own field.

We came over the field and ran into heavy flak, both medium and light. Tracers were also used. I was jolted all over and when I pulled out, was over Jerry’s field. I zoomed up and the flak became so heavy so I dove to keep from getting hit. Each time I zoomed up, I found myself in the flak, so I dove for the deck informing Lt. Zolner I was no longer with him. Lt. Zolner then called Lt Col. Rimerman and told him that his gas tank was hit and he was going to bail out.

After breaking off combat, I came home on the deck. I tried to zoom up but the flak forced me back down. About 14.00 hrs I ran into a train and strafed the engine thoroughly.

1st Lt. Richard Stearns saw what happened to Lt Zolner:

I saw Lt. Zolner flying the Colonel’s right wing. He was streaming gas in a steady spray, so he called the Group leader and told him he had been hit and was bailing out.

Lt Col. Rimerman advised him to stay with the ship until he got out of Germany. We provided escort for him as far as Hellendoers, where at an altitude of about 7000 ft he slowly rolled the ship over and bailed out. He did not make a delayed jump.

Lt Col. Rimerman and I circled the spot until he landed in the trees along the highway from Almelo to Zwolle. We saw a small closed car stop at the spot, and two people were seen to get out. A man on a bicycle was also seen to approach the scene from the west. At this time Lt Col Rimerman and I headed for home.

[Rimerman’s instruction to remain with the aircraft until out of Germany proved wise counsel to Zolner. In the car was a Dutch Doctor who started the process of getting the downed pilot to Switzerland and back to the Group, then stationed at Raydon, by September 18, 1944].

351st: Major Christian. T/U 11:17 hrs. T/D 14:50 hrs. Total flight time 03:33 hrs. Penetration support. Ijmuiden at 13:13 hrs, altitude at 24,000ft. 2nd Division at landfall point 12:18 hrs, altitude 25,000ft. Close formation within Groups, although wings were strung out. P-38s, P-51s and other P-47s [seen]. East of Celle at 13:30 hrs, altitude 20,000ft. Remarks: From landfall on in numerous bombers seen aborting.

Major Shannon Christian (Sqdn Ldr) YJ-S
2nd Lt Hassell D. Stump YJ-W
2nd Lt Cletus Peterson YJ-P
1st Lt Herman Herfurth (Flt Ldr) YJ-A
2nd Lt Robert C. Strobell YJ-F
2nd Lt George F. Perpente YJ-G
2nd Lt Francis L. Edwards YJ-T
1st Lt Vernon A. Leatherman (Flt Ldr) YJ-N
2nd Lt William J. Weaver YJ-H
1st Lt William J. Maguire YJ-M
2nd Lt Richard D. Stanley YJ-R
Capt Vic L. Byers (Flt Ldr) YJ-V
2nd Lt Harry D. Milligan YJ-Y
2nd Lt John G. Treitz YJ-J
2nd Lt Jack Terzian YJ-P
2nd Lt Richard L. Bedford (350th Relay) YJ-L
2nd Lt Rupert M. Tumlin (Relay) YJ-V
1st Lt Charles O. Durant (350th) YJ-I

352nd: Major Bailey. T/U 11:18hrs. T/D 14:40 hrs. Total flight time 03:22 hrs. Landfall in at 12:15 hrs over Egmond at 24-25,000ft. R/V with 2nd Air Div B-24s over middle of Zuider Zee at 12:20 hrs, 25,000ft. Bombers were early and in terrible formation; strung out and mixed B-24s and B-17s. Observed other 47s, 38s and 51s. 3 Fw190s bounced by our Squadron and during the attack several other 190s were encountered. This engagement resulted in 3 190s being destroyed and 2 190s damaged. These E/A were not attacking the bombers at this time. This engagement took place in the immediate vicinity of Dummer Lake at approx. 13:15 hrs at altitudes of 28,000ft to 0 ft. Left bombers at the time of engagement and did not rejoin them. Left enemy coast at 14:00 hrs. Flak encountered at several places along route but no unusual flak. Some flak did seem to originate from positions in open territory. Previous bombing results observed from Lembrach A/D at Dummer Lake. One town believed to be Loxten, Germany had been bombed sometime today and smoke was still coming from it. “A” Channel good. “C” Channel fair but could not contact Goldsmith3. Wakeford White#2 heard call “American Fighters – what is your position?” White#2 asked “Who are you, what is your call sign?” This was repeated by White#2 but the former did not answer. Route covered by 3/10 clouds, tops at 4,000ft. Horizontal visibility and vertical visibility good. Note: One Fort bellied in and burned just north of Lingen. One B-24 with one engine (right inboard) smoking was escorted from Dummer Lake to the middle of the North Sea. This A/C had the letter D within a white circle and the last three numbers were 497 and the letter N next to the star. Lt. Willits, returning home on the deck, damaged one gun position with personnel on beach between Ijmuiden and Egmond. Lt. Sperry, returning early, observed a B-17 by itself in mid-channel at 12,000ft heading toward the Belgium coast. This B-17 was flying a 160[?] degree course and passed in over Knocke at 12:10 hrs. This B-17 had star but no square or triangle. 1 Me109 had bellied in at Steinfeld A/D north of Dummer Lake. 3 P-47s [aborted] Lt. Sperry – wing tank connection broken. Lt. Callans – radio out. Lt. Kipfer – belly tank pressure tube broken. Claims 03-00-02 1 Fw190 destroyed Capt Robertson, 1 Fw190 destroyed Lt. Dustin, 1 Fw190 destroyed Lt. Knoble, 1 Fw190 damaged Capt Robertson, 1 Fw190 damaged Lt. Knoble, 1 gun position with personnel damaged Lt. Willits. Rounds fired: Robertson 1112, Dustin 598, Knoble 1963 and Willits 561. 1 P-47 Category AC, 1 P-47 Category A.

Major William B. Bailey (Sqdn Ldr) SX-U
2nd Lt Joseph A. Schillinger SX-F
1st Lt Leslie P. Cles SX-G
2nd Lt William S. Marchant SX-K
1st Lt Edward M. Fogarty (Flt Ldr) SX-O
2nd Lt Maurice Morrison (DNTO) SX-R
1st Lt Gordon S. Burlingame SX-M
1st Lt Charles W. Kipfer SX-Q
Capt Raynor E. Robertson (Flt Ldr) SX-S
2nd Lt Joeseph L. Knoble SX-P
1st Lt Clinton H. Sperry SX-N
2nd Lt Glenn G. Callans SX-V
Capt Thomas J. Forkin (Flt Ldr) SX-W
1st Lt William J. Jordan SX-A
1st Lt Gordon L. Willits SX-X
2nd Lt Harry H. Dustin SX-Z
1st Lt Robert P. Geurtz SX-I
2nd Lt Hildreth R. Owens SX-Y

Northeast of Dummer Lake at about 13:15 hrs the Squadron encountered six + Fw190s. In the ensuing action, ranging from 28,000 ft to the deck, Blue and Yellow flight accounted for three destroyed and two damaged. Capt. Raynor Robertson led Blue flight down to 500 ft and was credited with one destroyed and one damaged:

Three Fw190s came in at 6 o’clock about 5000 ft above us. We turned into them climbing. We made two orbits to the right and by that time we were about 1000 feet below them. They then dove for the deck and we followed them down. I closed in to about 400 yards and took several short bursts. I saw strikes all over the e/a each time I fired. The e/a pulled up to about 500 feet and the pilot bailed out. At this time my wing man, Lt. Knoble shot one Fw190 off my tail. I saw the e/a that he had destroyed crash into the ground.

At that time there were four more Fw190s circling Steinfield airfield to land and I got on the tail of one and got one short burst, then my guns ceased to fire. I saw a few strikes on the fuselage of the e/a. Then my wing man, Lt. Knoble, closed in and took a short burst on another Fw190.

2nd Lt. Joseph L Knoble was also credited with an Fw190 destroyed and one damaged as Blue Flight caught the enemy coming in to land:

I stayed with Capt. Robertson, my leader, and the Captain got on a 190s tail and let him have it. He got many hits on the e/a and I saw the pilot bail out. I called this in to the Capt. and he called to hit the deck.

Nearing the ground we spotted an airfield with two 190s circling it. The Captain said ‘Lets get them!’ And moved on to the number one, I stayed to cover him.

I saw the Capt. get strikes on the e/a and damage it. At this time the number two Fw190 moved in on the Captain’s tail and I closed in on it to about 2 or 300 yards, 30 degrees deflection and fired. I observed many strikes on the left wing root and then the canopy flew off and the pilot bailed out.

Another 190 appeared on my tail so I turned around into him and was able to out-turn him in a very short turn. I got several strikes on this e/a but then the airfield began shooting flak at me. My ammunition was gone so I hit the deck and came home.

Yellow Flight, led by Capt. Forkin, spotted the same group of Fw190s near the bombers and joined the attack. Yellow Four, 1st Lt. Harry Dustin was able to destroy one of the Fw190s:

Lt. Willits broke down on the three Fw190s. We chased one around and he went up in a turn to the left. The Fw190 then broke right into Lt. Willits, and I fired while going straight up. He snapped to the left and headed for the deck. I followed him down still shooting, observing many pieces falling off. I broke off to the left in a climbing turn and saw a parachute below me. Looking further back I saw a plane going down trailing heavy black smoke. Heavy flak was around us, so we hit the deck and came home.

1st Lt. Gordon L. Willits, Yellow Three, was experiencing problems with his aircraft’s supercharger and was unable to catch the 190s:

I was unable to get as high as the rest of the flight due to supercharger trouble so stayed below the flight .Three grey Fw190s came toward the bombers from three o’clock and started to circle above us. When they saw that we were climbing toward them they broke towards the deck with my wing man, Lt. Dustin, myself and another (Blue) flight in pursuit. The 190s kept turning which made it easier to catch them. One of the e/a broke away from the others and headed west; the remaining two were chased north by Blue flight. The single e/a, on seeing us, turned and I got a short burst at him head on. I had a little altitude advantage and tried to get on his tail but he kept turning underneath me. My wing man got him at this point and the last I saw he was going straight down with several large pieces coming off which looked like parts of the tail. My wing man yelled that he was following him down so I covered him. He yelled that the pilot of the 190 bailed out but I did not see him. I looked back and saw a puff of smoke and several large burning pieces of an e/a that Lt. Knoble had shot down.

The flak was pretty bad so I called to hit the deck which we did. Another P-47 joined us and we came out line abreast on the deck. I passed over a gun position on the Dutch coast and several machine guns and some German soldiers in it. I turned around and took several bursts at it and observed many hits.

Leave a comment

Filed under Missions

352nd Fighter Squadron Mustang Update

Mike Martorella has been in touch with some interesting additional photos he found in his father’s album. You will recall from my previous post that Lt. Michael J. Martorella flew with the 352nd FS at Raydon between November 1944 and the end of the war. So here are the photos and further information with many thanks to Mike for sharing this new material

 

A fascinating transitional photo showing P-51D-10-NA (44-14495) in the hands of Lt. Martorella (on wing) before he renamed it "Jeannie". Note the original "Dallas Doll" artwork has been replaced by the less stylised name on the nose. Note also that the artwork appears to  be the same as on the later "Jeannie" (M Martorella).

A fascinating transitional photo showing P-51D-10-NA (44-14495) in the hands of Lt. Martorella (on wing) before he renamed it “Jeannie”. Note the original “Dallas Doll” artwork has been replaced by the less stylised name on the nose. Note also that the picture appears to be the same as on the later “Jeannie” (M Martorella).

The famous picture of the fifth SX-I (a/c 44-14495) named for Miss Christine Crisp of Dallas, Texas by Lt. Frank H. Bouldin.

The famous picture of the fifth SX-I (a/c 44-14495) named for Miss Christine Crisp of Dallas, Texas by Lt. Frank H. Bouldin.

S/Sgt. Clarence E. Frye at the controls of "Jeannie" as Lt. Michael J. Martorella renamed "Dallas Doll." The photo is almost the exact same spot at Raydon as the photo above. (M Martorella)

S/Sgt. Clarence E. Frye at the controls of “Jeannie” as Lt. Michael J. Martorella renamed “Dallas Doll.” The photo is almost the exact same spot at Raydon as the photo above. (M Martorella)

A great photo of Lt. Douglas A. Makikuhna's P-51D-10-NA (a/c 44-14642) "Miss Ethel" SX-A (M Martorella).

A great photo of Lt. Douglas A. Makikuhna’s P-51D-10-NA (a/c 44-14642) “Miss Ethel” SX-A (M Martorella).

P-51D-10-NA (44-14694) SX-F. This aircraft was assigned to Lt. Niklaus and then to Lt. Albert P. Lang who was most likely responsible for the name "Eleanor" (M Martorella).

P-51D-10-NA (44-14694) SX-F. This aircraft was assigned to Lt. Niklaus and then to Lt. Albert P. Lang who was most likely responsible for the name “Eleanor” (M Martorella).

A final photo that is actually 350th FS aircraft at some point in 1945 (M Martorella).

A final photo that is actually 350th FS aircraft at some point in 1945 (M Martorella).

 

1 Comment

Filed under 352nd Fighter Squadron

Mission#89 March 6, 1944 – Target: Berlin. The Loss of 1st Lt. Robert N. Ireland, 350th Fighter Squadron.

Date: Mar 6, 44

Dispatched: 34 Aborts: 3

Mission: Penetration support to 1st ATF, 240 B-17s (3rd Div)

Field Order: 262 Target: Berlin

Time Up/Down: 10:33 hrs     13:43 hrs Leader: Lt Col. Duncan

Claims Air: 03-00-00 Claims Ground: 00-00-00 Lost/Damaged: 01-00

L/F in north of Ijmuiden 23,000ft, 11:21 hrs. R/V 3rd Div B-17s vicinity Dummer Lake 11:53 hrs. Bombers 18-24,000ft. Wings in good formation but spread out. Left bombers 12:25hrs, approx vicinity Gifhorn. L/F out north Ijmuiden 14,000ft, 13:00 hrs. As Group approached lead units vicinity Steinhuder Lake, 8-12 Fw190s made head on attacks from above thru the bomber formation. 3 destroyed. Combats from 19,000ft to 1000ft. 3 B-17s seen to go down in this area. About 10 chutes seen. One B-17 coming back 8-10,000ft escorted to enemy coast. Convoy of 16 ships preceded by 9 smaller ships headed 60 degrees along West Frisian Island. Fix given to controller by pilot. Fighter/bomber intercom good.

Lt. Ireland (350th FS) seriously injured at landing (died).

Two FW190s destroyed Col. Duncan.

One Fw190 shared destroyed Capt. Byers and Lt. Terzian (351st FS).

350th: [As the Squadron were converting to P-47D-15s only two pilots, Lts. Ireland and Dawson, flew with the 351st. The Intelligence officer submitted the following] T/U 10:33 hrs. T/D 13:43 hrs. Total flight time 03:10 hrs. L/F N or Ijmuiden, 11:20, 24,000ft. R/V 3rd Div at Dummer Lake, 11:53, 25,000ft. Good formation. P-47s, 51, 38. 12-15 Me109, Fw190, Steinhuder Lake, 7000ft. Left bombers NE of Hanover, 12:25, 25,000ft. Left coast N of Ijmuiden 13:00, 14,000ft. No flak.

351st: Major Christian. T/U 10:28 hrs. T/D 13:50 hrs. Total flight time 03:22 hrs. Route: In north of Ijmuiden – over Hanover – out north of Ijmuiden. Penetration support. One P-47 crashed landed near field due to enemy action (Pilot Lt. Ireland from 350th Squadron). Plane CAT E. Pilot wounded extent unknown. One Fw190 destroyed shared by Capt. Byers and Lt. Terzian. [L/F in] North of Ijmuiden at 11:20 hrs at 24,000ft. 3rd Division near Dummer Lake at 11:53 hrs at 25,000ft. B-17s close formation. Combat Wings good though somewhat spread out. B-24s flying loose formation. P-47s, P-38s and P-51s [see]. 12-15 E/A Me109s and Fw190s with Me109s predominating at Steinhuder Lake at 1000ft. [Left bombers] Northeast of Hanover at 12:25 hrs at 25,000ft. [L/F out] North of Ijmuiden at 13:00 hrs at 14-15,000ft. Remarks: Two B-17s seen going down in vicinity between Dummer Lake and Steinhuder Lake. Three white and one brown chutes seen to open. Germans heard on R/T.

Major Shannon Christian (Sqdn Ldr) YJ-H
2nd Lt William J. Weaver YJ-I
1st Lt William J. Maguire YJ-M
1st Lt Melvin P. Dawson (350th) YJ-F
Capt Vic L. Byers (Flt Ldr) YJ-V
2nd Lt Jack Terzian YJ-N
2nd Lt John G. Treitz YJ-J
2nd Lt Harry D. Milligan YJ-Y
Capt Frederick H. Lefebre (Flt Ldr) YJ-L
2nd Lt Hassell D. Stump YJ-W
Capt Charles L. Stafford YJ-P
2nd Lt Richard D. Stanley YJ-R
1st Lt Frank N. Emory (Flt Ldr) YJ-E
2nd Lt Cletus Peterson YJ-P
1st Lt Robert N. Ireland (350th) YJ-U 42-22771
2nd Lt Francis L. Edwards YJ-T
2nd Lt George F. Perpente (Spare) YJ-G
1st Lt John Sullivan (Relay 350th) YJ-S

As the Squadron made R/V Capt. Vic Byers took Red flight to attack a lone Fw190:

We made R/V with the bombers at 1200, slightly past our briefed time. Various and sundry e/a were seen in the first box of our ‘Big Friends’. I spotted two Me109s that had just come down through them, and I peeled off in pursuit. At 20000 ft a flight of four P-47s cut me out, so I pulled in for cover.

While watching them going down, I spotted a single Fw190 very low and evidently going home. After calling my Squadron Leader, I peeled off and positioned my flight for the kill. He was probably flying instruments, because he flew straight and level while we crawled up on his tail. I was about 500 yards behind and dead astern when he went through a small cloud and came out on the other side, still fat, dumb, and happy. I gave him a short burst and hit his left wing and then moved over and fired a 2 or 3 second burst. There were hits all around the cockpit and he started in a gentle dive. I pulled up then to keep from running into him and my wing man pulled into position.

Byers’ wing man, 1st Lt. Jack Terzian, then closed in to share the claim:

Capt. Byers pulled up sharply to the left. I throttled way back and moved into position. The e/a made a gentle climbing turn to the left. At about 300 yards and a ring of deflection, I gave him a short burst, observing no hits. Closing in at the same deflection, I gave him a long burst, observing strikes about the cockpit, and then the e/a burst into flames – very pretty!

1st Lt. Robert N. Ireland also chased some e/a down to the deck and was himself badly shot up. Ireland opted to nurse his shattered aircraft home to Metfield and as he came in to land he deployed flaps not realising that they had been damaged in the fight. Only one flap came down causing his aircraft to flip over and crash. Lt Ireland was found away from the wreckage still strapped to his seat but unconscious. Medics took him to the 65th General Hospital, but nothing could be done for him and he died of his injuries the following day having never regained consciousness.

The lost of Lt. Ireland hit his comrades hard and the Group Historian, Capt. Ernest P. MacGregor, wrote in tribute:

He will always be remembered by his comrades for his ability as a pilot, his cheerful outlook on life and his happy hours spent at the piano in the Officer’s Club improvising popular tunes for his friends. In the last regard he was quite entertaining. The piano has been silent since.

[The 65th General Hospital at Botesdale, Suffolk was staffed almost entirely by members of the famous Duke University Hospital. You can read more about it HERE and HERE.

352nd: Lt Col Duncan. T/U 10:26 hrs. T/D 13:56 hrs. Total flight time 03:30 hrs. Penetration support 2nd ATF, 3rd Div. L/F in N of Amsterdam at 11:20 hrs at 23-24,000ft. R/V with 3 Div of bombers N of Dummer Lake at 11:55 hrs or 12:00 hrs at 26,000ft. B-17 formation – fair. B-24s terribly strung out. Observed other P-47S AND p-38s. No P-51s seen. In vicinity of Nienburg many E/A seen, including several Me109s and Fw190s and 1 Me110 was observed. These E/A were making violent attacks on bombers and getting good results. Engagements with E/A took place in this vicinity with Col. Duncan destroying 2 Fw190s. Lts Jordan and Armstrong fired at 109s but are making no claims. 3 Forts in all were seen to go down, 3 chutes from 1, 4 from the second and 6 from the third. Left bombers in vicinity of Celle at about 12:25 hrs. Left coast over Ijmuiden at 12:58 hrs at 22,000 ft. Moderate, heavy flak, accurate, from Clappenburg. “A” – good, heard German on “A” channel believed he was trying to discourage us. “C” fair. 16 plus ship convoy composed of light boats, cargo vessels and believed to be tankers seen on a 60 degree heading 5 miles off the lower tip of Terschelling Island. Majority of ships flying balloons. Visibility was good over route. 6/10 clouds, tops around 6,000ft. Two Fw190s seen with yellow cowlings with bright red stripes under the cowl. 1 Fw190 seen with a green nose. 1 unidentified S/E A/C seen to go down in vicinity of Steinhuder Lake.

Lt Col Glenn E. Duncan (Gp & Sqdn Ldr) SX-U
1st Lt Robert P. Geurtz SX-I
1st Lt Clinton H. Sperry SX-F
2nd Lt Maurice Morrison SX-G
Capt Thomas J. Forkin (Flt Ldr) SX-W
1st Lt William J. Jordan SX-V
1st Lt William F. Streit SX-Z
1st Lt Herman Herfurth SX-K
Capt Charles J. Hoey (Flt Ldr) SX-S
2nd Lt Hildreth R. Owens SX-X
1st Lt Gordon S. Burlingame SX-M
1st Lt Charles W. Kipfer SX-Q
1st Lt Edward M. Fogarty (Flt Ldr) SX-Y
2nd Lt Harry H. Dustin SX-L
2nd Lt Clifford F. Armstrong SX-C
1st Lt Leslie P. Cles SX-D
2nd Lt William S. Marchant SX-P

Group Aborts/ERTN/Lost

[Unfortunately the aircraft aborts, early returns, lost and damaged reports from Wing to 8th Fighter Command are not available for the period March 5-19, 1944. I have checked through the microfilm reels (B5200-B5202) from the AFHRA at Maxwell and even went through the actual files when I was last there in January. Sadly, there is no trace of the data for this period unless anyone out there knows otherwise].

 

3 Comments

Filed under 350th Fighter Squadron, Missions