Monthly Archives: November 2012

Mission#41 November 5, 1943 – Target: Gelsenkirchen. The loss of Capt Orville A. Kinkade, Lt. Benedict E. Kraft and Lt. Robert L. Newman

Date: Nov 5, 43

Dispatched: 50 Aborts: 1*

Mission: General support to 1st, 2nd & 3rd TF (3rd Div) 180 B-17’s. Field Order: 170

Time Up/Down: 12:00 hrs 14:51 hrs Leader: Major Duncan

Target: Gelsenkirchen

Claims Air: 05-03-06 Claims Ground: 00-00-00 Lost/Damaged: 03-01

When Group arrived at R/V point at 13.16 hrs some of the bombers were apparently 5 to 7 minutes early, were seen leaving the target to the right. Two rear boxes of bombers were at R/V point. Major Duncan with 352nd made a right turn to take up escort position with the first box while the 350th and 351st escorted the rear box of bombers. 352nd stayed with the first box until mid Channel while the 350th left them at Geertruidinbert at14:00 hrs and the 351st leaving the bombers at Schouwen Islands at 14:10 hrs, 28,000ft. In the target area 20+ Me109s were coming from the east at 28,000ft flying in P-47 formation with one flight stacked higher than the rest about to attack the bombers. 352nd FS positioned to attack the top flight who immediately took evasive action. Some of the a/c had belly tanks. It is interesting to note that e/a waggled their wings evidently attempting to identify themselves as friendly a/c. South of the target three more flights of Me109s attempted to attack the bombers but were dispersed by the 352nd FS claiming one destroyed and one damaged. 351st encountered 50+ e/a in the target area and many more about 25 miles SW of the target and during the following engagements two e/a were destroyed, two probably destroyed and two damaged. Capt. Beckham shares a destroyed Me410 with an u/i P47 because it was firing on the e/a at the same time. 25-30 e/a flying in flights of 4 or 5 a/c were encountered by the 350th in the vicinity of Gelden resulting in two destroyed, one probably destroyed and two damaged. Opinion of the pilots is that enemy reaction today was heavier than seen for some time. Intense flak and smoke screens seen in target area. One B-17 observed on fire in the vicinity of Goes and 4 chutes seen. Radio was extremely intense.

Lt. Newman, 350th FS, Capt. Kinkade and Lt. Kraft 351st Missing in Action

350th Fighter Squadron

1 Me210 destroyed Lt. Price

1 Me210 destroyed Lt. Stearns

1 Fw190 probably destroyed Lt. Hurst

2 Fw190s damaged Major Rimerman

351st Fighter Squadron

1 Me109 destroyed Capt. Kinkade

1 Me410 destroyed Capt. Beckham

1 Fw190 probably destroyed Capt. Beckham

1 Me109 probably destroyed Lt. Peterson

1 Me109 damaged Lt. Emory

1 Me210 damaged Lt. Emory

352nd Fighter Squadron

1 Me109 damaged Major Glenn E. Duncan (Gp HQ flying with Sqdn)

1 Fw190 damaged Capt. Raynor E. Robertson

1 Me109 destroyed Lt. Leroy W. Ista

350th: Major Rimerman. T/U 12:05 hrs. T/D 14:50 hrs. Total flight time 2:45 hrs. L/F was made on course. Escort position was assumed just as bombers were coming off bombing run at 34,000ft. Bombers were at 27,000ft to 31,000ft. Flights of E/A were sighted coming in at about 27,000ft vicinity of Geldern. Major Rimerman made two attacks by diving zooming on flights of 4 or 5 Fw190s in each flight. In the first attack the Fw190 broke sharply after Major Rimerman had scored strikes. The second attack caused another Fw190 to split ‘s’. Good hits were observed on this Fw190. Major Rimerman claims 2 Fw190s damaged. Lt. Newman flying White 3 was lost from Major Rimerman’s flight on first attack. Lt. Furness, Newman’s wingman, reports that he and Newman went after flight of Fw190s as Major Rimerman delivered attack, zoomed, then started down again. Lt. Furness turned in evasive action when something was reported on his tail. The last he saw of Lt Newman was in a dive apparently after an E/A. No calls were heard. Lt. Hurst’s flight bounced E/A in same vicinity. Lt. Hurst scored hits on one Fw190 claiming a probable destroyed. Lt. Price attacked and destroyed an Me210 delivering attack at about 22,000ft. Lt. Stearns also destroyed an Me210. During attacks Lt. Hurst found a lone B17 at about 27,000ft being attacked by two Fw190s. He was unable to turn into leading Fw190. The second Fw190 was seen to go down firing at an unidentified P-47. Lt. Stearns sustained battle damage. Lt Newman NYR. Flak vicinity of target intense barrage type. Weather over enemy territory: visibility excellent except for slight ground haze. Five pilots fired guns: Major Rimerman, Lt. Hurst, Lt. Price, Lt. Stearns, Lt. Tanner (Lt Tanner makes no claims).

Major Ben Rimerman (Sqdn Ldr)
1st Lt Melvin P. Dawson
1st Lt Robert L. Newman LH-J 42-7907
1st Lt Joseph F. Furness
Capt Wilford F. Hurst (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Richard A. Stearns (a/c BD) LH-Z 42-8480
1st Lt William J. Price
2nd Lt William F. Tanner
Capt Dewey E. Newhart (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt John H. Winder
1st Lt Francis T. Walsh
2nd Lt Robert S. Hart
1st Lt William W. Odom (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt Tom Lorance
1st Lt John Sullivan
1st Lt Roland N. McKean
1st Lt Charles O. Durant
2nd Lt Walter L. Angelo

Major Rimerman led the attack that day and claimed two Fw190’s damaged:

My wing man, Lt Dawson, and I bounced the leading flight, attacking on the right of the line. As we closed, the Fw190 I was lining up on started to waggle his wings, as I started to fire from about 400 yards, he immediately  flicked over and split ‘S’d down. I turned left to get on the next one but he too was breaking down and left. The e/a on the far left of the flight had at this time turned right, and was shooting at us from 90 degrees as we zoomed back into the Sun. I observed a few non valuable strikes on the e/a’s left wing as he flicked over. All the e/a in this flight appeared to have scattered and gone down as we could not find them above

After the first combat, I was flying again at 27000ft. We observed 4 to 5 Fw190’s making a line abreast attack on a straggling B17 at about 29000ft. We dove down and closed to about 400 yards and I started firing while the Fw’s appeared just out of range of the B17. I observed good strikes and flashes on the left wing root of the e/a I attacked. This Fw190 went down in a steep spiral to the right as we recovered from the dive and pulled back up from the bomber formation. The flight of e/a attacking the straggler had scattered and disappeared.

It was during the second attack that 1st Lt. Robert Lee Newman was lost. Called ‘Moose’ because of his large size, the likable pilot was flying the number three position in the lead flight. He was listed as missing in action though nobody really saw what happened. His wing man, 1st Lt. Joseph Furness, reported on his possible fate:

Lt. Newman broke up the middle formation of enemy aircraft. We then both zoomed up from 20 to 24000ft. We started to head in the general direction of our Squadron leader, when Lt. Newman started diving again. I noticed an Fw190 in my mirror at 7 o’clock. I called Lt. Newman on the R/T and when he did not answer or make any attempt to turn, I turned into the e/a who immediately headed towards the deck when I positioned myself above him. The last time I saw Lt. Newman was in the dive as he was heading for the edge of the flak defences of Dusseldorf. I went down looking for my element leader, making several large sweeps over the area, but was unable to locate him.

Lt. Newman held the Air Medal with one oak leaf cluster and was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously. He is buried in the Ardennes American Cemetery in Neupre, Belgium. Further details can be searched for HERE.

This was not the end of the action for the 350th that day. Red flight, led by 1st Lt. Wilford F. Hurst, saw enemy aircraft at the rear of the bombers as they turned off the target. Hurst dove down with his flight and was credited an Fw190 damaged:

I came down on them from behind and was getting in range when the planes, 4 Fw190’s, saw us. The leader rolled over and he was followed by his #2 and #3 man. I was able to begin firing at the #4 at 250 yards before he rolled. I gave him a long burst, but could feel that all my guns were not firing. I continued the burst as he rolled over on his back. I observed a few strikes on his canopy. The Fw shuddered and started down as if out of control. I last saw him going straight down. I had to break off as two more flights of Fw190’s were in a position to bounce us. I zoomed back up to 27000ft.

I saw 4 twin engined ships below, at about 20000ft, at 2 o’clock. I called my flight, which was still together after the previous attack, for a bounce. I came down behind the e/a which we determined later to be Me210’s. I closed immediately on the 4th e/a. I began firing at 250 yards and closed to 150 yards without observing any strikes.

Hurst made no claim for the Me210, thinking his wing man had closed in and shot down this aircraft. The enemy flight of four however had split with two aircraft breaking to the right and left. The remaining two proceeded straight ahead. Hurst was awarded a probable for the right hand aircraft and his wing man, 2nd Lt. Richard A Stearns, closed to destroy the second aircraft:

I concentrated my attack on the left aircraft. I closed until the range was about 250 yards and then gave a short burst, observing strikes on the right wing. I closed further to about 200 yards giving about a two second burst, observing more strikes and also seeing the canopy fly off. The right engine burst into flames and left a thin stream of white smoke. The e/a went into a vertical dive from about 23000ft, and I saw it go all the way down, hit the ground and explode.

After leaving my first combat and proceeding on my way out alone, I sighted an Me210 at my level, 25000ft. The e/a was a good thousand yards ahead of me. I started to turn into him, and gave several short bursts but saw no strikes. As the e/a started to turn inland I broke off combat and resumed my course.

1st Lt. Bill Price was in the number 3 position and also claimed a 210 destroyed:

The aircraft was in a tight turn to the left evading my flight leader. I was flying #3 position and found myself just above and behind the Me210 as he rolled out of his turn. My #1 and #2 men were attacking two other ships in the flight of Me210’s, so I dove onto the tail of the Me210 below me as he rolled out of his turn, and I opened fire at about 500 yards. I saw no hits in the first burst, so I fired a second burst after closing to about 250 yards. This burst produced many hits on the fuselage and wing root, and the ship started smoking. As I broke left up over the Me210, I could see flames and smoke coming out of it. My wing man, Lt Tanner, saw the ship going down in flames and crash.

 

351st: Major Christian. T/U 11:52 hrs. T/D 14:52 hrs. Total flight time 3:00 hrs. Route: In north of the Hague. R/V at Borken, escort to Gilsenkirchen, out at Texel Island.

Major Shannon Christian (Sqdn Ldr)
1st Lt Gordon B. Compton
2nd Lt Herbert K. Field
2nd Lt George F. Perpente
Capt Frederick H. Lefebre (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Harry D. Milligan
1st Lt George N. Ahles
2nd Lt Hassell D. Stump
Capt Walter C. Beckham (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Benedict E Kraft YJ-Q 42-8428
1st Lt David C. Kenney
2nd Lt Irving Toppel
Capt Orville A. Kinkade (Flt Ldr) YJ-K 42-6583
F/O Cletus Peterson
1st Lt Frank N. Emory
2nd Lt Francis L. Edwards
1st Lt Francis N. King
2nd Lt John G. Treitz

The 351st encountered 50 + enemy aircraft in the target area and a series of fierce dogfights took place. Yellow flight, led by Capt. Kinkade, was in position above and to the left of the first box of bombers. His wing man, Lt. Peterson, saw a flight of 3 Me109’s:

We immediately bounced them at 24,000ft. In the meantime Lt. Emory and Lt. Edwards (second element) left us to attack another flight leaving Kinkade and I to bounce the 3 Me109’s. The 109’s were flying a wide ‘V’ formation so Kinkade took the one on the left and I took the one on the right, leaving the leader to take his alternate action. We attacked from out of the Sun and I slipped to the outside of the turn and dropped a bit behind. Kinkade closed in fast and I was a bit slow in closing in. I opened up from about 425 yards and closed to 325 yards. I saw smoke coming out of the right wing of the 109 after I fired three short bursts.

When the leader saw his flight bounced he immediately took evasive action by rolling over and going down. The 109 I was shooting at followed his leader and went down. We didn’t follow them because we thought they would hit the deck and we wouldn’t be of any use as protection to the bombers. Instead the Me109 rolled out at 18,000ft. When Capt. Kinkade saw this he decided to bounce them again, so we attacked them from out of the Sun. One of the Me109’s must have continued down as there were only two when we bounced them a second time. Capt. Kinkade took the 109 on the left again and I took the one on the right. The one I bounced dove straight down and Capt. Kinkade broke away in a diving turn to the left. I decided that I wouldn’t be able to catch mine so followed Kinkade providing cover for him. He was following his 109 down shooting all the time. The Me109 was hit pretty bad as there was a terrific amount of smoke coming from it. About 12,000ft I observed three bogies coming down on us so I broke into them. They broke up and continued to head on down. I called Kinkade on the R/T but received no answer from him. The last I saw of him was when he was on the tail of the Me109 which was smoking badly and going down. He never returned. His victory was confirmed and that brought his total to three destroyed and two damaged. I hope he is a PW or trying to get back here.

After I broke into the 109’s I started to climb to gain altitude which I needed badly. There was two flights of enemy planes, one on each side of me. I was worried about them bouncing me but they never did. One flight tried to get in behind me but I kept turning towards them and they didn’t attack. About 22,000ft I saw three 109’s attacking a lone B17 which had an engine on fire and was going down. They were shooting the hell out of the Fortress and it didn’t have a chance. I thought I could try and help but I wouldn’t have been able to get in position in time and the B17 was too far gone to save. I hope the crew made it.

About 25,000ft a lone Fw190 made half a pass at me but I saw him in time and was able to turn toward him and break up his attack. It passed about 25 yards off my wing and I could see the pilot fairly plain. I watched him to see if he would attempt a pass at my tail, but he continued inland.

I climbed to 30,000ft and started for home as I was low on gas. It seemed like it took me years to get to the coast and all I could think about was how I could get out of there. They shot up light flak at me at the Dutch Island but it wasn’t too close. The flak in the Ruhr proved to be much worse. I landed with very little gas and almost kissed the ground. It sure was a long haul and seemed longer than it really was!

Kinkade was captured passed through Dulag Luft then Grosstychow and Dulag 12 as a POW. He survived the war and was credited with a 109 destroyed for the November 5 mission (Peterson’s claim was not confirmed).

1st Lt. Frank Emory, leading the second element, was also credited with an Me109 and an Me210 damaged. Walt Beckham with Blue flight also got into the fight and claimed an Me410 destroyed and Fw190 damaged:

The general area to the right of the bombers, as they turned right and headed home, contained considerable numbers of single engine e/a, those that we came near enough to identify being Fw190’s. We started toward single e/a or pairs several times, that were attacking or flying toward the bombers. Each time the e/a evaded downward and we did not follow.

We attacked eight or ten Fw190’s that were about 25000ft and in the same area. These e/a did not break downward, but split up. A four plane flight of them turning east first and orbiting, the others started off in the opposite direction. My #3 and #4 attacked these latter e/a. My #2 and I attacked the four that turned right. I fired as I closed to short range on one. Got a lot of strikes chiefly on the right side of the fuselage, but could not observe the e/a after overshooting. He had a belly tank centrally mounted.

After breaking of, we continued right turn a few degrees to head west and resume escort position. Made a slight weave to the left and saw a Fw190 closing on the 47 behind me (I did not read his ship letter but feel it must have been Lt Kraft). I called to him to break and turned as steeply as I could to the left. I saw the Fw190 firing, close to short range and over shoot, making strikes on the left side of the 47’s fuselage.

We continued to turn as steeply as possible on the Fw190 and I made at least two 360 degree turns trying to get on each others tail. I could not gain so loosened up the turn going east, tightened it all I could going on around to the west. Was able to get a burst in from head on; am not sure with what effect. I then proceeded west again. The 190 refused to close from head on and broke downward. Was unable to see what the 47 that had been hit did, could get no answer by radio.

I proceeded westward trying to locate the bomber formation. Flew by several twin engine e/a that were very close and nearly the same level (about 25000ft). I could see other P-47’s in the immediate vicinity, so turned slightly and attacked one of the e/a that was on my right. It was a Me410 or 210. Believe that the canopy was more squarely cut than a 210.

I fired a short burst or so from 20 to 40 degrees deflection and opened fire again from astern and about 400 yards. While I was firing, I saw a P-47 from the corner of my eye only a few yards to the left of me firing at the same target. I could see shells kicking out from the underside of his wings. Pulled out to the right to avoid collision and dropped back behind the e/a to fire another burst or so after he had pulled away. Observed strikes when I first fired from astern, and also saw strikes from the other 47’s shooting. When I started firing the second time his right engine was on fire. I could see flames as well as smoke. A man bailed out as I was pulling away and I saw that his chute had opened when I looked back a few minutes later. Also saw another chute a little higher and further back in the vicinity of the e/a’s flight path.

Beckham’s wing man, 2nd Lt. Benedict E Kraft did not evade the Fw190 soon enough and spent the rest of the war as a POW at Stalag Luft I Barth-Vogelsang.

352nd: Major Duncan. T/U 12:00 hrs. T/D 14:46 hrs. Total flight time 2:46 hrs. Squadron made landfall on course at 23,000ft, made R/V with bombers on time. Encountered e/a over target area and destroyed one, damaging another. Made landfall out over Haamstede where one B-17 was seen flying on the deck and being attacked by several e/a. No attempt made to drive off these planes because of low altitude.

Major Glenn E. Duncan (Gp & Sqdn Ldr)
1st Lt Charles W. Kipfer
1st Lt William F. Streit
2nd Lt Russell E. Moriarty
Capt Raynor E. Robertson (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt Leroy W. Ista
1st Lt Gordon L. Willits
2nd Lt Joseph A. Schillinger
Major William B. Bailey (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Clifford F. Armstrong
1st Lt Gordon S. Burlingame
2nd Lt Harry H. Dustin
1st Lt Thomas J. Forkin (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt William J. Jordan
1st Lt Robert A. Newman
2nd Lt Glenn C. Callans
1st Lt Wilbert H. Juntilla (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Maurice Morrison SX-R 42-8687
2nd Lt William S. Marchant
2nd Lt Donald J. Corrigan

In the target area 20 + Me109’s were seen coming from the east at 28000ft flying in a P-47 formation, with one flight stacked higher than the rest. As they were about to attack the bombers Major Duncan, leading White flight, led the 352nd to attack the top flight and claimed a 109 damaged:

I was leading the Group on the bomber escort mission to Gelsenkirchen. The bombers were met and the Squadrons took up their escort position. At this time I saw approximately 25 Me109’s flying in flights of four coming toward the bombers from the east. After positioning ourselves in an advantageous spot above and behind the e/a we dove down to break them up. I led my flight on four Me109’s and as they saw us coming broke to try and turn into us. I made various long shots at several Me109’s to scare them more than destroy them because we did not have time to chase them around the sky while the bombers went on by themselves. I made no claims at the time because I was disgusted with my long range shooting. Later I received my film assessment showing visible hits on one Me109. So I reckon that I had better claim an Me109 damaged just for the record sake.

Red Fight covered White flight as they made their attack. The leader, Capt Raynor Robertson, fired at an Fw190 making a 90 degree attack and claimed a damaged after he observed strikes on the aircraft’s wings. His wing man, 1st Lt. Leroy Ista, destroyed a 109:

I fired a short burst at the e/a and flew through our flight and was thrown wide. I pulled up and saw a flight of 5 109’s attempting to bounce the bombers from 9 o’clock. I was about 1,000ft above and 300 yards away so I made a head on attack to break them up. I fired a short burst at the leader. Saw no hits. I didn’t have enough deflection so I pulled around and got on their tails at about 3000 yards. I closed to about 2000 yards and another flight of P-47’s bounced them so I pulled over the top. One 109 pulled out and I got on his tail at about 500 yards. I closed to 300 yards and fired a five second burst from 10 degrees deflection. No hits were visible. Closed to about 200 yards firing as I went. I was then at about 100 yards and slightly below and kept on closing and opened fire at 150 feet, still closing. I fired a 3 second burst which struck fair in the wing section from outside of the canon and all over the center section and all over the bottom of the fuselage. A large flash about 3 feet in diameter appeared about 4 feet forward of the tail. The pilot did a quick roll to the right and I passed over him. He was smoking badly all over the center section and it appeared like ammunition in the right wing was on fire. I pulled up and climbed back up and did a tight climbing turn.

I was alone in the sky then except for one e/a which I tried to get in position to attack. I then observed the e/a I had fired on (a 109) go down trailing a huge column of smoke. He appeared to be doing a slow turn to the left going straight down. The nose came up somewhat, and it went over on its back and went straight down. I did not see an explosion but I did see a large column of black smoke coming from the end  which went to the ground.

As I was climbing to get into position. Three 109’s attempted to bounce me at 26,000ft from 7 o’clock and above. I gave it the gate and climbed into the Sun. They managed to close to about 1000 yards. I think they fired at me but I climbed away from them. I climbed to 36,000ft and tried to rejoin my Group but could not find them, so started home.

Lt. Leroy W. Ista's Me109, November 5, 1943

Lt. Leroy W. Ista’s Me109, November 5, 1943

A close shot of the Me109 credited to Lt. Ista. The photo is undated, but it is assumed to be the same Me109 as Ista was credited with one victory during his time with the 352nd FS.

A close shot of the Me109 credited to Lt. Ista. The photo is undated, but it is assumed to be the same Me109 as Ista was credited with one victory during his time with the 352nd FS.

Group Aborts, Early Returns, Lost and Damaged:

42-8480 BD Cat   A LH-Z Lt. Stearns
42-7907 MIA LH-J Lt. Newman
42-8428 MIA YJ-K Capt. Kinkade
41-6583 MIA YJ-Q Lt. Kraft

*The Control Tower Log also indicates that Lt. Morrison in SX-R (a/c 42-8687) returned early at 12:13 hrs (unknown cause).

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Filed under Missions

Mission#40 November 3, 1943 – Target: Wilhelmshaven

Date: Nov 3, 43

Dispatched: 51 Aborts: 6

Mission: General support to 240 B-17’s Field Order: 168

Time Up/Down: 11:54 hrs 15:02 hrs Leader: Lt Col. McCollom

Target: Wilhelmshaven

Claims Air: 05-00-01 Claims Ground: 00-00-00 Lost/Damaged: 00-00*

Made R/V with bombers at 13:01 hrs in the vicinity of Groningen at 27,000ft. Bombers at 22 to 24,000ft considerably spread out. 356 Group with bombers almost to IP. Flares seen and bombs dropped at about13:25 hrs. Stayed with bombers as planned leaving them just beyond East Frisian Island at 13:40 hrs. Our Group divided into four 12 ship Squadrons. Two Squadrons supporting the first two wings. Two Squadrons supporting rear two wings. This appeared successful but four wings of B-17s seen to be too many for one Group to support because of area involved. Bombing results unobserved because of solid overcast in target area. Ten t/e e/a coming from the East attempted to bounce the rear end of the second box of bombers in the target area at 23,000ft. They were intercepted by white flight of the 352nd FS, five being destroyed, other[s] dove away. Two Me109s engaged in target area at 27,000ft resulting in one damaged. Fifteen + Fw190s flying in formation from 3 o’clock at 23,000ft positioning to attack bombers. One element of the 351st FS headed into them and they immediately split S’d and headed down. Both fired short bursts, but made no claims. One B-17 from first box seen going down smoking in target area. Two large vessels protected by four smaller ships possibly Sperbrechers [?] seen entering Zuider Zee in channel off Texel Island. Pilot returning early reported seeing ten e/e e/a orbiting over this convoy approaching Den Helder from the south. Moderately heavy flak over target. High whistling screech on Channel A. Usual whine on Channel C. Contact made with bombers satisfactory. Capt. Rose and Lt. Thistlethwaite of Group HQ participated.

351st Fighter Squadron

1 Me109 damaged Lt. Stump

352nd Fighter Squadron

1Me110 destroyed Lt. Poindexter

1Me210 destroyed Lt. Poindexter

1 Me110 destroyed Lt. Newman

1 Me110 destroyed Lt. Morrison

1 Me110 destroyed Lt. Juntilla

350th: Major Rimerman. T/U 11:52 hrs. T/D 15:00 hrs. Total flight time 3:08 hrs. Squadron led by Major Rimerman on course on time. R/V made with rear box of bombers and escort position was taken up on left side. About 10 minutes before Sqdn was ready to leave bombers one B-17 was seen straggling. One Me109 positioned itself for an attack on the straggler from 15,000ft or 16,000ft. Lt. Odom called to the Squadron leader but was not in position to deliver attack. Lt. Sullivan sighted one B-17 explode in the vicinity of the target. Lt. Devane filling in one of Wakeford flights followed flight down in attack on Me110S. He observed one Me110 go down burning as a result of attack by a P47. Flak of medium intensity vicinity of the target. Weather overcast prevented ground observations. Target Wilhelmshaven, Germany FO 168.

Major Ben Rimerman (Sqdn Ldr)
1st Lt Robert N. Ireland
1st Lt Robert L. Newman
1st Lt Joseph F. Furness
Capt Wilford F. Hurst (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Richard A. Stearns
1st Lt Melvin P. Dawson
1st Lt John Zolner
Capt Dewey E. Newhart (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt John H. Winder
1st Lt Francis T. Walsh
2nd Lt Robert S. Hart
1st Lt William W. Odom (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt Tom Lorance
1st Lt John Sullivan
1st Lt Roland N. McKean
1st Lt John L. Devane
2nd Lt Carl W. Mueller

351st: Major Christian. T/U 11:45 hrs. T/D 14:50 hrs. Total flight time 3:05 hrs. Route: In S of Den Helder, R/V at Winschoten, escort of Wilhelmshaven and out at Texel Island.

Major Shannon Christian
1st Lt George N. Ahles
Capt Walter C. Beckham
2nd Lt Herbert K. Field
Capt Frederick H. Lefebre
2nd Lt John G. Treitz
Lt Col Loren G. McCollom
2nd Lt William T. Thistlethwaite
F/O Cletus Peterson
2nd Lt Hassell D. Stump
2nd Lt Frank J. Mincik
2nd Lt Edgar J. Albert
2nd Lt Don M. Hurlburt
2nd Lt Harry D. Milligan
2nd Lt Irving Toppel
2nd Lt Richard D. Stanley

The Squadron were covering the right hand side of the leading box, when three or four minutes before the bombs were dropped about 15 to 20 coal black Fw190’s, in flights of four, line abreast came in toward the bombers. The Squadron were at 27000ft and turned into them causing them to break off their attack, evading violently.White flight dove on two Me109’s south west of Wilhelmshaven and 1st Lt. George N. Ahles, the number 3 man, was able to fire a short burst at the 109 after entering a ‘Lufberry’ [a defensive horizontal circle involving multiple aircraft that makes it very difficult to attack without being exposed to return fire]. He positioned himself on the 109’s tail but the range was too extreme to register hits. His wing man, 2nd Lt. Hassell D. Stump, had slightly better luck when he claimed a damaged:

I called to my element leader to break into them and the four of us got into a Luftberry to the left. We had a slight advantage of height but neither we, nor the enemy could get any advantage on the other. Finally Lt Ahles told me to continue to the left and he would go to the right. As he did, one of the 109’s started a dive. I watched him, as well as the other one, who continued the Luftberry with me. Just as my element leader got into position to fire, he started to zoom back and get on Lt Ahles tail. But before he could get a lead I had pulled in at about 30 degrees deflection and gave him a short burst, immediately noticing strikes on the tail section. He broke away from the attack on Lt Ahles, so I continued to follow him and as I fired again, two guns on the right refused to fire causing my plane to yaw and pulling my sight off target, so I ceased firing and corrected my aim. This time all guns on the right had ceased firing and one on the left, but I jammed in the rudder and continued firing, closing from 40 to 50 yards at which time I pulled up and to the right to avoid collision. As I pulled up he disappeared under my wing, so I rolled back to the left and saw him split ‘S’ and head straight down. I thought it useless to follow him with only a couple of guns, so I zoomed back to 20000ft.

The original caption for this publicity photo indicates that 2nd Lt. Hassell D. Stump (0-736405) had just shot down an enemy aircraft. Given that he is seated in a P-47 and his other credited victory was an Me262 damaged December 23, 1944 it seems likely this refers to his damaged claim November 3, 1943. His regular aircraft at this point would have been YJ-K “Squirt” (a/c P-47D-5-RE 42-8674). Stump was from Ocean Park, California and joined the Squadron June 11, 1943. He went on to fly two tours with the Squadron and completed January 8, 1945 having risen to the rank of Capt.

352nd: Major Bailey. T/U 12:01 hrs. T/D 14:50 hrs. Total flight time 2:49 hrs. Squadron took off with Major Bailey leading but was turned over to Lt. Juntilla when the leader had to return with radio out. Made R/V one minute early. Proceeded without event to target area. 10 twin engine e/a were encountered over the target, four of these being destroyed and one probably destroyed [presumably later confirmed as destroyed according to other records]. One B-17 was seen going down in smoke shortly after passing over target.

Major William B. Bailey (Sqdn Ldr) ERTN SX-B 42-8466
1st Lt Leroy W. Ista
1st Lt Jesse W. Gonnam
2nd Lt Harry H. Dustin
1st Lt Wilbert H. Juntilla (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Russell Moriarty
1st Lt James N. Poindexter
2nd Lt Maurice Morrison
1st Lt Edward M. Fogarty
2nd Lt Joseph A. Schillinger
1st Lt Robert A. Newman
1st Lt John L. Devane (350th FS)

The mission was handed over to 1st Lt. Wilbert Juntilla when Major Bailey’s aircraft experienced radio trouble. Ten twin engined enemy aircraft came in from the east over the target to attack the rear end of the second box of bombers. In the battle that followed five enemy were quickly dispatched boosting morale for the Squadron who had so far failed to achieve a big score. Juntilla was leading White flight and claimed an Me110:

As the first bombers turned away from the target after dropping their bombs, 10 Me110’s and 210’s went in at them from 4 o’clock at about 24000ft. Wakeford Squadron attacked out of the Sun and evidently were not seen by the enemy. I got on the tail of one Me110 and shot two bursts at close range. He suddenly turned downward and I pulled up over him. A piece of the 110 put a dent in the wing of my wing man (2nd Lt Russell E Moriarty). I then turned to make another attack on the rest of the formation but there were none left.

Others in the flight had followed Juntilla and also scored. 1st Lt James N Poindexter, flying number 3 man, was in luck and claimed an Me110 and 210 destroyed:

Our flight attacked them from up Sun and dead astern. I opened fire on the Me 210 at approximately 350 or 400 yards and fired one long burst closing very rapidly. The burst caught him right in the middle causing numerous strikes and flashes. The e/a exploded and burst into flames. I flew through the burning pieces of e/a just after it exploded.

I broke off this attack and began another on an Me110. The first burst brought many strikes in the cockpit and wing root section of the right wing. This burst was about 300 yards, I followed closing rapidly. The e/a burst into smoke and started down at about 22000ft. My second and third bursts missed I think, but the fourth caught him in the centre section. I saw many strikes and a burst of flame and smoke come from the 110. It continued straight down pouring smoke from the centre section.

2nd Lt. Maurice Morrison, flying Poindexter’s wing also scored:

Lt. Juntilla led the flight down and started firing at an e/a that went into a left turn, I then lost him because I followed Lt Poindexter on an Me210 which blew up. I then went under Lt Poindexter and started firing at an Me210 at about 300 yards. Strikes came from the right side of the cockpit and wing root and several large pieces came off. He went into a left spin with fire coming from his right wing a fuselage.

Wakeford Blue flight followed White flight into the attack. 1st Lt. Edward Fogarty, Blue leader, was not able to score any hits but his element lead, 1st Lt. Robert A. Newman completed what was a good day for the 352nd with an Me110:

I turned left and started down, there were about 6 P-47’s going down after them almost abreast. I closed and picked out an Me110. I fired one 30 degree deflection shot at about 300 yards and then came in to line astern and fired until I almost rammed him. I fired 900 rounds of ammunition. I set his engine on fire and pulled over to the side and up as I went passed. I then rolled to go and get another shot and saw him spiraling down. A long trail of flame and smoke was coming from his left engine and wing almost up to the fuselage. We were then down at about 15000ft and I started to go after another, but was called back by the Squadron leader.

Group Aborts, Early Returns and Battle Damage:

42-7972 ERTN   belly tank wouldn’t release YJ-P
41-6528 ERTN   radio out YJ-W
42-22458 ERTN   escort SX-L
42-22466 ERTN no   radio reception SX-E
42-8471 ERTN   oxygen regulator out SX-S
42-8466 ERTN   radio out SX-B Major Bailey

*There are also records that indicate LH-U 42-7988 received some kind of battle damage on this date.

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Mission#39 October 24, 1943 – Target: St. Andre

Date: Oct 24, 43

Dispatched: 52 Aborts: 9

Mission: Top cover to B-26’s Field Order: 166

Time Up/Down: 11:33 hrs 13:56 hrs Leader: Major Duncan

Target: St Andre

Claims Air: 00-00-00 Claims Ground: 00-00-00 Lost/Damaged: 00-00

Group arrived at R/V at 12:30 hrs. No bombers seen. Crossed French coast at 12:40 hrs, 25,000ft,10 miles north east of Fecamp. Group leader informed by 56 Group that they were going a little higher. Controller advised bombers on course on time just before landfall. Because of overcast leader climbed to 34,000ft before breaking out of cloud in vicinity of Le Neubourg. Flew course south of Danville making left turn passing over St. Andre de Leure, out west Dieppe, 24,000ft at 13:17 hrs. Nothing of importance to report. Capt. Rose and Lt. Herfurth of Group HQ participated. Lt. Herfurth returned as escort for Major Bailey.

350th: Major Rimerman. T/U 11:45 hrs. T/D 13:45 hrs. Total flight time 2:00 hrs. No R/V was made with the bombers although Squadron was on course on time. Sqdn climbed through overcast to 33,000 ft or 34,000 ft and came out above the overcast as Major Rimerman’s radio went out. No e/a No flak. No action.

Major Ben Rimerman (Sqdn Ldr)
Capt John B. Rose
2nd Lt William J. Price
2nd Lt William F. Tanner
Capt Stanley R. Pidduck (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt Tom Lorance
1st Lt Charles W. Dinse
2nd Lt John H. Winder
Capt Dewey E. Newhart (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Francis T. Walsh
1st Lt Wayne K. Blickenstaff
2nd Lt Robert S. Hart
1st Lt Wilford F. Hurst (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Richard A. Stearns
1st Lt Melvin P. Dawson
2nd Lt John Zolner

351st: Major Duncan. T/U 11:25 hrs. T/D 13:55 hrs. Total flight time 2:30 hrs. Route: St Vallery en Caux – Damville to St Andre, out near Dieppe.

Major Glenn E. Duncan (Sqdn & Gp Ldr)
2nd Lt Lloyd A. Thornell
1st Lt William R. Burkett
2nd Lt Harold J. Morris
Capt Orville A. Kinkade (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Herbert K. Field
1st Lt Frank N. Emory
2nd Lt Francis L. Edwards
1st Lt Gordon B. Compton (Flt Ldr)
F/O Cletus Peterson
1st Lt William J. Maguire
2nd Lt Benedict E Kraft
1st Lt Vernon A. Leatherman (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Richard D. Stanley
1st Lt Francis N. King
2nd Lt Edgar J. Albert
F/O Joseph E. Wood (spare)
Major Shannon Christian (Listed as flying in Sqdn records)
1st Lt Harry F. Hunter (Listed as flying in Sqdn records)
2nd Lt George F. Perpente (Listed as flying in Sqdn records)

352nd: Major Bailey. T/U 11:33 hrs. T/D 13:46 hrs. Total flight time 2:13 hrs. Squadron left English coast on time and made an orbit over English channel, but did not see bombers at any time. Layer of cirrus overcast extending from 26,000ft to 34,000ft was encountered and Squadron went through these clouds in order to form top cover so that enemy coast and lower Groups could not be seen. Squadron was beleived to be in general area of the target when recalled. Could not establish contact on fighter-bomber channel so there was no way to determine if protection was afforded bombers.

Major William B. Bailey (Sqdn Ldr) ERTN
1st Lt Herman Herfurth (listed in MSR)
1st Lt Gordon L. Willits
2nd Lt Russell Moriarty
1st Lt Edward M. Fogarty (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Richard V. Keywan
1st Lt Clinton H. Sperry
2nd Lt Glenn C. Callans
Capt Raynor E. Robertson (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Hildreth Owens
1st Lt James N. Poindexter
2nd Lt Harry E. Dustin
Capt Charles J. Hoey (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Joseph Schillinger
1st Lt Gordon S. Burlingame (listed in MSR)
2nd Lt Maurice Morrison
1st Lt Wilbert H. Juntilla (Spare)
1st Lt Leroy W. Ista (Spare)
2nd Lt Donald J. Corrigan (listed in Sqdn records)
1st Lt Charles W. Kipfer (listed in Sqdn records)

*Note that for all three Squadrons there are two flight line-ups available. The Squadron records and a Mission Summary Report (MSR). The names listed above are a combination of both sources and an accurate line-up seems impossible to confirm.

Group Aborts/Early Returns/Battle Damage:

42-74671 ABT   lost flight YJ-T
42-8457 ABT   tach out YJ-O
42-7906 ERTN   escort YJ-L
42-7972 ABT   supercharger out YJ-P
42-74736 ERTN   escort YJ-U
42-22477 ABT   instruments out YJ-S
42-8380 ABT   loss of belly tank pressure YJ-A
42-8466 ABT   engine cut out SX-B Major   Bailey
42-8374 ERTN   escort SX-D Lt.   Herfurth

At 18:30 hrs that evening 1st Lt. Charles W. Dinse of the 350th FS was returning home from Goxhill after visiting a former Squadron member Lt. Farlow. Making a night landing he lowered his landing gear too late and bellied in Major Rimerman’s plane LH-V (a/c 42-8001):

I was flying number 4 position in an eight ship flight. We approached the field and peeled off in two sections of four. Being dark, Captain Newhart called on the R/T and told the flights to take plenty of space.

After peeling off, I put my landing gear handle in the down position at the time I saw the gear of the ship ahead of me coming down, after which I proceeded to make a normal approach. Just as I was about to set the ship down, the Control Tower at the end of the runway shot a red flare, however at that stage it was too late to go around. I believe that I landed touching the tail first and coming down on the bomb rack. I immediately cut all the switches and jumped out of the plane.

Major Rimerman’s reaction to the breaking of his aircraft is not known…

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Mission#38 October 22, 1943 – Target: Cambrai – The Loss of Lts. Walter B. Stone and Alan W. Lowe, 350th Fighter Squadron

Date: Oct 22, 43

Dispatched: 51 Aborts: 5

Mission: Supplementary top cover to B-26s  Field Order: 165

Time Up/Down: 15:19 hrs 16:59 hrs Leader: Lt Col. McCollom

Target: Cambrai

Claims Air: 00-00-00 Claims Ground: 00-00-00 Lost/Damaged: 02-00

Group made landfall in vicinity of Dunkirk at 15:55 hrs at 22,000ft. After flying thru solid wall of Cirrus clouds up to 30,000ft Group leader turned back, possibly crossing out enemy coast in the Boulogne area. One pilot went to 36,000ft before breaking out of the overcast. Weather: thin alto stratus base 16,000ft encountered opposite Manston. Dense cirrus merging into altostratus, no appreciable breaks, top of cirrus 36,000ft. Visibility excellent below cloud, less than 100 yeards in cloud. Intervals of extreme turbulence encountered up to 25,000ft. Lts. Lowe and Stone 350th MIA. Capt. Rose and Lt. Herfurth Gp HQ participated. Lt. Herfurth returned due to oxygen trouble.

350th: Major Rimerman. T/U 15:30 hrs. T/D 17:00 hrs. Total flight time 1:30 hrs. Squadron enterred enemy coast at Dunkirk, swept inland for five minutes, made right orbit and left coast. Group recalled by controller because of weather. Lt. Lowe, flying number 2 position in white flight was seen to spin out of left turn made by flight after turn was begun. Left turn made by flight after [a] right turn was begun. Left turn made to avoid aircraft on right. Capt. Newhart was last person to see Lt. Lowe as he spun out of turn. Lt. Stone, number 4 man of white flight, had to leave formation when left turn was made and flight went on instruments. He was last heard over the radio to call reporting that he had lost his flight. Major Rimerman ordered him to go out on his own. Lt. Stone failed to return from mission. Lt. Zolner’s ship sustained slight flak damage in wing and fuselage.

Major Ben Rimerman (Sqdn Ldr)
1st Lt Alan W. Lowe MIA LH-D 42-8683
Capt John B. Rose
2nd Lt Walter B. Stone MIA LH-L* 42-7989
Capt Stanley R. Pidduck (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt John H. Winder
1st Lt Wayne K. Blickenstaff
1st Lt Tom Lorance
Capt Dewey E. Newhart (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Robert S. Hart
1st Lt William W. Odom
2nd Lt Joseph Rosenberg
1st Lt Wilford F. Hurst (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt Richard A. Stearns
1st Lt John L. Devane
2nd Lt John Zolner LH-Z 42-8480

*The source for this aircraft lettering is that Lt. Price was listed in the control Tower Log as flying LH-L on September 5, 1943. This can be cross referenced with the list contained in the accident report for that day. I’m not 100% convinced the CT log is accurate in this instance however.

It was a tragic day for the Squadron losing two recent replacement pilots. About 10 miles east of St. Omer, Capt. John B. Rose’s wing man, 2nd Lt Walter Buster Stone got into difficulties as Capt Rose reported:

On a true course of 183 degrees we entered a cirrus overcast at 15:43 at about 16,000 feet. At this time Lt. Stone was still on my wing after we had entered the overcast. I lost sight of Lt. Stone because of concentrating on flying the flight leaders wing.

The Squadron climbed to an altitude of about 27,000 feet when a 180 degree port turn was made, the Group Commander having ordered the Group to return home. I believe that Lt. Stone, who had been lagging most of the way, lost contact with the flight shortly before the turn was made.

Capt. Rose also had a lucky escape when his aircraft spun and he returned home alone. Lt. Stone was killed when his aircraft crashed and he is remembered on the tablets of the missing in the Ardennes American Military Cemetery. You can search for further details HERE.

About ten years ago I received a letter from France informing me that the crash site had been located in Tournehem Forest to the west of St. Omer and that engine and other parts of the aircraft recovered. I’m not totally convinced it was Lt. Stone’s aircraft as the letter mentioned black and yellow cowling sections being found which would not, given the date of the crash, have been in use at that time. A mystery that perhaps someone out there can shed some light on?

In Red flight that day, Capt Dewey Newhart’s wing man, 1st Lt Alan Ward Lowe, was also killed:

I was leading Red flight when the mission was recalled by the controller. My Squadron Commander made a turn to the left and a slight descend to return to base. After completing about 20 degrees of the turn, Lt. Lowe pulled up to the right and out of the formation in a vertical left bank, snapping to the right, and going down. He disappeared under the nose of my aircraft, and this was the last I saw of him. This happened between 26,000 and 27,000ft.

Lt. Lowe was awarded the Air Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster and is buried in the Normandy American Cemetery. You can see further details by searching at the American Battle Monuments Commission HERE.

351st   : Lt Col McCollom. T/U 15:19 hrs. T/D 16:55 hrs. Total flight time 1:36 hrs. Route: In at Dunkerque, orbited and returned to base bad weather.

Lt Col Loren G. McCollom (Sqdn & Gp Ldr)
2nd Lt Richard D. Stanley
2nd Lt Lloyd A. Thornell
F/O Joseph E. Wood
Major Shannon Christian
1st Lt William J. Maguire
1st Lt William R. Burkett
2nd Lt Harold J. Morris
1st Lt Harry F. Hunter
Capt Orville A. Kinkade
F/O Cletus Peterson
2nd Lt George F. Perpente
2nd Lt Francis L. Edwards
1st Lt Vernon A. Leatherman
2nd Lt Frank J. Mincik
1st Lt Francis N. King
2nd Lt Benedict E Kraft
1st Lt Gordon B. Compton
2nd Lt Edgar J. Albert

352nd: Major Bailey. T/U 15:04 hrs. T/D 16:51 hrs. Total flight time 1:47 hrs. Major Bailey led the Squadron, making landfall at Gravelines at 15:55 hrs. There was a complete overcast at the coast, but the Squadron continued on course trying to climb out of it. The Group leader recalled and Squadron returned to station.

Major William B. Bailey (Sqdn Ldr)
2nd Lt Russell Moriarty
2nd Lt Richard V. Keywan ERTN
2nd Lt Glenn C. Callans
2nd Lt William S. Marchant
2nd Lt Maurice Morrison
2nd Lt Harry H. Dustin
2nd Lt Clifford Armstrong
1st Lt Charles W. Kipfer
1st Lt Gordon L. Willits
1st Lt Wilbert H. Juntilla (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt Robert A. Newman
Capt Raynor E. Robertson (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt Gordon S. Burlingame
Capt Charles J. Hoey (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt Clinton H. Sperry
1st Lt Leroy W. Ista

Group Aborts/Early Returns/Battle Damage:

42-74618 ERTN   belly tank wouldn’t release LH-?
42-8634 ERTN   belly tank wouldn’t release LH-X
42-7910 ERTN   belly tank wouldn’t draw fuel SX-J
42-22465 ERTN   belly tank wouldn’t draw fuel SX-Y
42-8664 ERTN   oxygen system failure SX-? Lt.   Herfurth
42-8480 BD Cat   AC LH-Z Lt.   Zolner
42-8683 MIA LH-D Lt.   Lowe
42-7989 MIA LH-L Lt.   Stone

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Mission#37 October 20, 1943 – Target Duren

Date: Oct 20, 43

Dispatched: 54 Aborts: 13

Mission: Withdrawal support to 2nd TF 120 B-17’s Field Order: 163

Time Up/Down: 13:28 hrs 15:44 hrs Leader: Lt Col. McCollom

Target: Duren

Claims Air: 00-01-02 Claims Ground: 00-00-00 Lost/Damaged: 00-00

Group crossed the enemy coast at Maristede at 14:06 hrs and proceeded on course making R/V with the bombers at Waldenrath at 30,000ft, 14:29 hrs. At 14:09 hrs the Group leader developed engine trouble and was forced to return, Capt Pidduck, Blue leader, 350th FS taking over. R/V with lead units of the 2nd TF as outlined in the FO at 14:29 hrs, 30,000ft. Bombers were at 28,000ft. Second box of bombers considerably strung out from the first box. One Squadron went back and circled over them. Being unmolested they retired to escort position with the lead unit. Left bombers at 14:55 hrs at Zevendergen, where another Group of P-47’s took up withdrawal support. Out at Westhoofd at 15:10 hrs at 20,000ft. 10+ Me109s were seen at our level at 2 o’clock just after R/V. Turning into them they broke down and away. Just after R/V point another gang of 3 Me109s were seen flying parallel with the bombers and upon turning into them they turned right and headed inland. Enemy tactics seemed to take advantage of cloud cover to manoeuvre, as our aircraft would turn to attack another e/a would appear from out of the clouds to position himself on the tail of our aircraft. Enemy fighters did not appear to be too aggressive but wished to engage the attention of our fighters rather than any concerted attack on the bombers. Pilots seemed to think enemy fighters were more experienced than recently encountered. A large white burst seen over Herrenthal apparently coming from centre of bomber formation on way to target. 5 to 6 freighters and 5 barges towed by tugs seen in Oostercheld. Approx 20 aircraft seen to land on field near Zerkzee on Schouwen Island. One large splash seen in Channel. Upon investigation only large oil slick visible. No chutes in the vicinity. Two flights circled. One flight leader gave mayday at 3,500ft. Radio whine not as intense as usual. Lt. Thistlethwaite, Capt. Stafford and Lt. Herfurth of Group HQ participated. Capt. Stafford returned early due to radio trouble.

One Me109 probable by Lt. Fogarty 352nd

Two Me109s damaged by Capt. Hoey 352nd

One Me109 damaged by Lt. Morris 351st

350th: Lt Col McCollom and then Capt Pidduck. T/U 13:19 hrs. T/D 15:45 hrs. Total flight time 2:26 hrs. One returned with prop failure. L/F was made at 14:06 hrs north of Walcheren Islands. Made R/V with bombers at 14:29, about 30 miles NW of target. Escorted bombers about 30 miles east of Eindhoven and in vicinity of Amsterdam. No action.

Lt Col   Loren McCollom (Sqdn Ldr)
1st Lt   Alan W. Lowe
2nd Lt   William J. Price
2nd Lt   William F. Tanner
Capt   Dewey E. Newhart (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt   Francis T. Walsh
1st Lt   Wayne K. Blickenstaff
1st Lt   Tom Lorance
Capt   Stanley R. Pidduck (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt   Walter B. Stone
1st Lt   William W. Odom
1st Lt   Wilford F. Hurst (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt   Richard A. Stearns
1st Lt   Melvin P. Dawson
2nd Lt   John Zolner

351st: Major Christian. T/U 13:12 hrs. T/D 15:48 hrs. Total flight time 2:36 hrs. Route: In at Haamstede, R/V with bombers at Duren, escorted out to Turnout, out Schouwen Islands.

Major   Shannon Christian (Sqdn Ldr)
2nd Lt   William T. Thistlethwaite
Capt   Charles L. Stafford
2nd Lt   Hassell D. Stump
Capt   Frederick H. Lefebre
2nd Lt   Don M. Hurlburt
1st Lt   David C. Kenney
2nd Lt   Irving Toppel
2nd Lt   John G. Treitz
1st Lt   Vic L. Byers
Capt   Orville A. Kinkade
F/O   Cletus Peterson
1st Lt   Harry F. Hunter
2nd Lt   George F. Perpente
Capt   Jack R. Walsh
F/O   Joseph E. Wood
1st Lt   William R. Burkett
2nd Lt   Lloyd A. Thornell
2nd Lt   Harold J. Morris
2nd Lt   Jack Terzian

352nd: Major Bailey. T/U 13:35 hrs. T/D 15:27 hrs. Total flight time 2:02 hrs. Major Bailey was leading the Squadron but had to return to station and Capt. Hoey took over. Made landfall south of Haamstede at 14:06 hrs, two minutes late. Proceeded on course and encountered five Me109s near rendezvous point. Capt. Hoey believed to damage two Me109s and Lt. Fogarty believed to have damaged one. Made rendezvous with bombers and made left turn to escort them out. Four white Fw190s were observed but not damaged. They were flying approximately 2,000ft above the Squadron’s formation which was at an altitude of 31,000ft. Approximately 20 enemy aircraft seen to land on field near Zierkzee.

Major   William B. Bailey (Sqdn Ldr) ERTN
2nd Lt   Edison G. Stiff
2nd Lt   Hildreth Owens
2nd Lt   Clifford Armstrong ERTN (escort to Fogarty)
2nd Lt   William S. Marchant
2nd Lt   Victor L. Vogel
2nd Lt   William J. Jordan
2nd Lt   Glenn C. Callans
1st Lt   Charles W. Kipfer
1st Lt   Jesse W. Gonnam
Capt   Charles J. Hoey (Sqdn Ldr)
1st Lt   Clinton H. Sperry ERTN
Capt   Raynor E. Robertson (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt   Robert P. Geurtz
1st Lt   Thomas J. Forkin
1st Lt   Robert A. Newman
1st Lt   Edward M. Fogarty (Flt Ldr) ERTN Motor
1st Lt   Leslie P. Cles

Group Aborts/Early Returns:

42-8531   ERTN   engine overheated   SX-C
42-8428   ERTN   radio dead   YJ-?
42-8395   ERTN no belly tank fuel pressure   YJ-S
42-7972   ERTN   escort
42-8446   ERTN   low oxygen
42-8471   ERTN   escort   SX-S
42-8522   ERTN   belly tank wouldn’t release
42-8376   ERTN   supercharger regulator out   SX-Q
42-7910   ERTN   radio too loud   SX-J
42-8687   ERTN   engine cutting out   SX-R
42-22462   ERTN   escort   SX-P
42-7900   ERTN   temperature problems
42-74659   ERTN   escort

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Mission#36 October 18, 1943 – Target Duren

Date: Oct 18, 43

Dispatched: 52 Aborts: 6

Mission: Withdrawal support  to 2nd TF 120 B-17’s Field Order: 162

Time Up/Down: 13:50 hrs 15:52 hrs Leader: Lt Col. McCollom

Target: Duren (Abortive)

Claims Air: 00-00-00 Claims Ground: 00-00-00 Lost/Damaged: 00-00

Group crossed over the Schouwen Island at 14:46 hrs, 26,000ft. When over Turnhot at 15:00 hrs Group was advised by controller to return to home base [and] made right turn. Came out at Walcheren Island at 15:52 hrs, 30,000ft. At 14:56 hrs in vicinity of Woensdrecht leader advised to take up escort of 1st TF. Weather approx as forecasted. Visibility excellent. Capt. Rose, Lt. Thistlethwaite and Capt. Stafford of HQ participated.

350th: Major Rimerman. T/U 13:50 hr. T/D 15:45 hrs. Total flight time 1:55 hrs. 7 returned early, one belly tank trouble, one mechanical trouble, one instrument trouble, one pilot error and three as escort. The Squadron was led by Major Rimerman. Squadron entered coast over Schouwen Island and penetrated to vicinity of Turnhout. High cloud sat about 28,000ft over the continent. Some flak visible from the vicinity of Antwerp. [Lt Rosenberg landed at Harwich].

Major   Ben Rimerman (Sqdn Ldr)
1st Lt   Alan W. Lowe
Capt   John B. Rose
2nd Lt   John Zolner
Capt   Stanley R. Pidduck (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt   Walter B. Stone
1st Lt   William W. Odom
2nd Lt   Joseph Rosenberg LH-X  42-8634
Capt   Dewey E. Newhart (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt   Francis T. Walsh
1st Lt   Wayne K. Blickenstaff
2nd Lt   Walter L. Angelo
1st Lt   Wilford F. Hurst

351st: Major Christian. T/U 13:50 hrs. T/D 16:02 hrs. Total flight time 2:12 hrs. Route: In at Walcheren Islands to Turnout, orbited leaving coast at Haamstede.

Major   Shannon Christian (Sqdn Ldr)
2nd Lt   William T. Thistlethwaite
Capt   Charles L. Stafford
2nd Lt   Harold J. Morris
Capt   Orville A. Kinkade
2nd Lt   Francis L. Edwards
1st Lt   Harry F. Hunter
2nd Lt   George F. Perpente
1st Lt   David C. Kenney
1st Lt   Gordon B. Compton
Capt   Frederick H. Lefebre
2nd Lt   Harry D. Milligan
2nd Lt   John G. Treitz
2nd Lt   Irving Toppel
Capt   Jack R. Walsh
F/O   Joseph E. Wood
1st Lt   William R. Burkett
2nd Lt   Lloyd A. Thornell
1st Lt   George N. Ahles
2nd Lt   Hassell D. Stump

352nd: Lt Col McCollom. T/U 15:50 hrs. T/D 15:51 hrs. Total flight time 2:01 hrs. This mission was recalled at Peers, pilots received single credit.

2nd Lt   Maurice Morrison
1st Lt   Gordon L. Willits
2nd Lt   Russell Moriarty SX-J     42-7910
2nd Lt   Clifford Armstrong
2nd Lt   William S. Marchant
2nd Lt   Edison G. Stiff
2nd Lt   William J. Jordan
2nd Lt   Glenn C. Callans
2nd Lt   Donald C. Corrigan
1st Lt   Jesse W. Gonnam
Capt   Charles W. Hoey (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt   Clinton H. Sperry
Capt   Raynor E. Robertson (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt   Robert P. Geurtz
1st Lt   Thomas J. Forkin (Flt Ldr)
1st Lt   Robert A. Newman
1st Lt   Edward M. Fogarty (Flt Ldr)
2nd Lt   Leroy W. Ista

Group Abort/Early Returns:

42-8373 ERTN   belly tank wouldn’t draw LH-?
42-74618 ERTN   pilot illness LH-?
42-7909 ERTN   gyro out LH-?
42-8392 ERTN   escort LH-?
42- 8634 ERTN   escort LH-X
42-74736 ERTN   tach out YJ-U
42-74671 ERTN   belly tank wouldn’t release YJ-T

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